Prusa i3 MK2S 3D printer kit assembly time lapse videos

Prusa i3 MK2S 3D printer kit assembly time lapse videos

If you’ve ever wanted to see someone assemble a 3D printer from the ground up, I’ve captured every detail, sped it up, and set it to music just for you:

Link to 300x time lapse video (longer, more detail, different background music):
20170323 GoPro Prusa i3 MK2 assembly and print (300x time lapse)

The videos were captured using a GoPro Hero 3 Black in time lapse mode taking a wide angle high definition image every 5 seconds to a 64GB micro SD card.  The camera was mounted to a tripod using parts printed on the Replicator 2 and powered using a USB hub.  The resulting 30fps HD videos were created at 400% and 200% speed respectively.

History…

In 2012 I bought a MakerBot Replicator 2 for my father, which he graciously offered to keep at my house (he’s absolutely the BEST sharer).  He has since moved to a larger house and in December 2016 we happily moved the 3D printer to it’s new and rightful home in his shop where it has been getting good use making parts for an interesting capacitive network antenna power coupling project, and lots of little toys for the grand kids.  It was a great turn-key printer, able to easily slice and print models with its simple intuitive software.  Unfortunately without a heated bed and with limited head temperature it could only print using PLA. This left me without convenient access to a 3D printer, but gave me the opportunity to expand my 3D printing horizons.  I’d been considering buying one for a while, but finally I needed to make a decision.

The search…

For me, selecting a new 3D printer was as difficult as buying a new car.  There are a lot of decisions to make: Cartesian or delta? Retail, kit, or clone? Open or closed source? Which hotend? Cooling fans? Heated bed? Which materials (PLA, ABS, PETG, Nylon…)? What software can be used? and the biggie… How much do I want to spend?

I started my search with the usual “top 10” lists and “3D printer” roundup articles.

# 1 in All3DP top 10 in 2017
(All3DP is totally worth subscribing to by the way)
#1 in Make Magazine 2017 3D printer comparison
Make Magazine review:
Toms 3D review:
If you are interested in 3D printing and are not familiar with Tom, you should be, check out TOM’s 3D  website for some of the best, balanced, scientific reviews and comparisons of 3D printing components, printers, and filaments:
Tom‘s YouTube Channel:
Tom is also a moderator on Google+‘s fantastic 3D Printing group:

I didn’t have to look for very long before one machine started to tick all my boxes:

  • Open Source
  • Kit (and assembled versions available)
  • Cartesian
  • Auto mesh bed leveling
  • Part cooling fan (for PLA)
  • Heated bed (for ABS and other materials)
  • Multi-material
  • Multi-slicer,
  • Affordable
  • … and as an added bonus it has a 4 color upgrade coming later this year.

The Prusa i3 MK2

The machine…

The Prusa i3 MK2 is the latest printer designed by RepRap legend Josef Prusa, and the one at the top of the 2017 best 3D printers lists all over.  If you are not familiar with RepRap (http://reprap.org/) , it is a community of hardware and software makers who have been advancing open source 3D printing for the last couple of decades.  The basic concept behind RepRap is to create a machine capable of creating copies, or improved copies, of itself.  We all have that community to thank for democratizing and popularizing 3D printing to the point where fused filament 3D printing became commercially viable for the public (that, and a couple patents expiring).

Josef has been at the heart of two of the most popular recent open source 3D printer designs: the Mendel, and the Prusa (his namesake), each model undergoing several successful iterations and improvements.  In 2009 Josef Prusa opened shop and began selling printers and kits.  Today, true to his RepRap roots the latest machine, the Prusa i3 MK2 is used to print parts for customers printers in Prusa Research’s “build farm”.

Josef Prusa in Prusa Research’s build farm where Prusa printers are printing Prusa printers.

If you’d like to know more about the printer check out the Prusa website.

The wait…

I was going to order it over Christmas break 2016 but was waffling. I wasn’t sure if the printer was getting too much hype, or if I should get a dedicated dual head printer, or if I should just grab a turn-key printer like a Taz from a local store.  That delay would cost me a lot of time.  I eventually committed to ordering the Prusa i3 Mk2 kit in late January for a whopping $773 (USD) including shipping, an extraordinarily modest price.  Due to high demand and limited supply capacity for parts like the custom heated bed, I would have to wait 3 months.  This was not a surprise, Prusa was very clear about the lead time for their printers.  I received the printer late March.

The assembly…

By now I hope you have watched the assembly video(s).  I could have ordered the printer fully assembled and calibrated for an extra $200 (and extra lead time) but part of the reason I wanted an open source printer is to easily modify and improve it, and for that reason I wanted to know each nut and bolt personally.  It took roughly 8 hours, 5 good beers, 3 cats, and a dog (all featured in the videos) to assemble, test, and calibrate the machine.  The tree frog took 3 1/2 hours to print.  I had already read all the assembly instructions while waiting for the printer, and learned a LOT from watching Tom’s 6 part series about building the cheapest possible clone of the Prusa i3 MK2. (16 1/2 hours of interactive YouTube live streams!!! The clone was eventually named “Dolly” by someone in chat for the first cloned sheep of the same name)

  1. Prusa i3 MK2 live assembly: p1, Y-axis
  2. Prusa i3 MK2 3D printer clone live assembly: p2, X & Z Motion
  3. Prusa i3 MK2 3D printer clone live assembly: p3, X & Y Motion
  4. Prusa i3 MK2 3D printer clone live assembly: p4, Wiring and Printbed (mechanics finished!)
  5. Prusa i3 MK2 3D printer clone live assembly: p5, Electronics and Firmware!
  6. Prusa i3 MK2 3D printer clone live assembly: p6, final setup and first print!

If you decide to get the Prusa i3 MK2 kit or assemble a clone, here are some tips…

  • When there is a captured nut, POUND that nut into place before assembling the parts!!! Both Tom and I had the upper nut from the part cooling fan come loose and bounce around inside assembled parts for tens of minutes before carefully getting it seated.
  • Read ahead.  There are a few steps that provide instruction regarding previous steps like “but don’t over tighten”, or other things that may be should have been said in advance.
  • Look at all the pictures and stay organized.  The instructions are done VERY well in the “Ikea” style.  There are many details that you can only get from the pictures.
  • Be careful to use the correct length/size fasteners, rods, etc.
  • Review each step when done to make sure you didn’t skip or overlook anything.

The quality…

The print quality is amazing.

I haven’t had a lot of time to print many models yet but the resolution and quality of the first PLA print of the tree frog are far and away better than anything I’ve seen before.  It’s only 50mm wide but the surface is so smooth from the .5mm layer height, and the underside is flawless due to the part cooling fan.  The details in the eyes, nostrils, and hips are impressive too.  I’ve also printed a Raspberry Pi case, camera mount, (for OctoPi) and computer stand mounts in ABS.  I’ll be printing some drone parts soon in PETG and ABS, and bought some Nylon to play with.  I’ve tried Slic3r and Cura model slicing software used to convert models to g-code files for 3D printing.  I  preferring Slic3r which was provided by Prusa pre-optimized for this printer, but they are both very good tools.  Stay tuned to blog.workshop88.com for more of 3D printed projects in the future.

Finally, on the topic of Dolly, and a home made clone…

Even though I just bought, assembled, and am still coming up to speed on my fantastic new printer, the idea of building a clone for 1/4-1/3 the price (somewhere in the $250 range) has me and several friends on the verge of starting a group clone build.

Thanks!

Thanks to Kevin Meinert of subatomicglue for letting me use his awesome music in the videos.  If you would like to hear more, visit www.subatomicglue.com.

If you’re interested in building a Prusa or another 3D printer, or a clone, or discussing 3D printing, check out Workshop 88 on Google groups, Slack, or come by our weekly open house any Thursday night after 6:30pm.  Details can be found here.

D. Scott Williamson
Compulsively creative

Maker of CamBam supports Workshop 88 makerspace!

HexRay supports Workshop 88 with a complimentary
CamBam site license & member discount!

Workshop 88 would like to extend a big thank you to HexRay for supporting the our CNC efforts by allowing us unlimited use of CamBam on club Windows and Linux computers plus a discount on CamBam to Workshop 88 members.

For more information about CamBam, check out their website: http://www.cambam.info/

From the website:

CamBam is an application to create CAM files (gcode) from CAD source files or its own internal geometry editor. CamBam has many users worldwide, from CNC hobbyists to professional machinists and engineers.
CamBam currently supports the following:

  • Reading from and writing to 2D DXF files.
  • 2.5D profiling machine operations with auto-tab support
  • 2.5D pocketing operations with auto island detection
  • Drilling (Normal,Peck,Spiral Milling and Custom Scripts)
  • Engraving
  • True Type Font (TTF) text manipulation and outline (glyph) extraction.
  • Conversion of bitmaps to heightmaps
  • 3D geometry import from STL, 3DS and RAW files
  • 3D waterline and scanline machining operations
  • Extendable through user written plugins and scripts

Be sure to check out their CamBam bundles with Mach 3 controller and CutViewer too.  Personally, I purchased the full CamBam + Mach 3 + CutViewer bundle; I couldn’t beat the price and I’ve been happy with them to this day.

As if that wasn’t good enough: “Unlicensed CamBam installations will continue to work after the 40 evaluation uses are up and allow editing drawings and viewing toolpaths.  However, g-code output is limited to 1000 lines, so another option is for people to work on designs at home, then bring them in to the group’s licensed computers to generate g-code.”

This level of support from HexRay is fantastic and something Workshop 88 greatly appreciates!


I have been using CamBam as my go-to CAD-CAM software for many years, to see a sampling of the kinds of things it can do, take a peek at some of my personal CamBam projects:

3D vacuum forming mask mold master for independent movie

Utility shelf for beverages and keys

Wall artwork – Wooden V

Engraved Bahr family crest

Atari Adventure engraved sign

Philosophy Custom Guitars engraved sign

Working miniature TV

Halftone portrait

Stay tuned to see CamBam powered Workshop 88 CNC projects!

…and on behalf of Workshop 88:

THANK YOU Andy @ HexRay!

If you’d like to find out more about Workshop 88, please contact us:
http://blog.workshop88.com/interact-with-us/ or stop by our weekly open house any Thursday evening after 6:30pm.

D. Scott Williamson
Compulsively Creative

Visit to Solid State Depot, Boulder Colorado

I was in Boulder this week and while there I thought I’d check out Solid State Depot, the local Boulder hackerspace (http://boulderhackerspace.com/)… Tuesday is their weekly open house meeting night. It was awesome!

Outside the entrance

This is the entrance, the colored lights flash and cycle, I knew I was in the right place before the Uber driver found a place to park.  The Uber driver’s name was Sam, he earned his masters degree in the arts and started a fine art collaboration and printing company in 2015 which sounded pretty cool.  He didn’t know what a hackerspace was so I explained and invited him to come inside with me to check it out.  We got a tour and while there he got tips where to find laser cutters he can use in town.  Incidentally, while in high school, Sam lived in Glendale Heights, IL, the same Chicago suburb my wife is from.  I thought “wow, small world” but I had no idea… I’ll get back to that later.

Entrance/reception area

This is the entrance area.  It seems like every maker/hackerspace has a coin op cabinet at some point, I think this one may be powered by the Raspberry Pi I spied in the marquis.  They also have free stuff and we all seem to get the same 20″ box fans from the same place.  I felt right at home.  They have a big doocracy poster hanging in the lobby too (not pictured).


The next few pictures are of the main area. The woodshop is off to the right, the CNC area is in back, and the electronics lab and test room are smaller rooms off the entry area.  Ted, in the lower right in the blue sweater, seated in front of the PBR greeted me.  I introduced myself as being from Chicago and a member of Workshop 88 and he showed me around.  He was really nice, I got the feeling they take turns meeting people and giving tours, just like us, which worked well.  Ted told me that a membership costs $65 and gives you the familiar 24 hour full access to the space, equipment, and materials within reason.

They have a large crowd of regulars with deep knowledge of many topics.  Seated high on the right in the green jacket is Sebastian (“Seb”), a contributor/maintainer of Linux CNC.  Paul the left of him in the picture (mostly obscured by Mike M.) is a former NVIDIA employee who wrote the timer ladder for the Linux drivers, he is an expert in GPUs.  On the other side of Seb is Ben in the blue jacket, his recently departed grandfather worked for Tektronics.  Ben had a nice oscilloscope for sale and wanted to offer it to the club at a discount before posting it online which was really nice of him.


They have weekly club meetings at 8:00pm on Tuesdays during the open house.  They open with a call to the meeting and everyone sets aside what they are doing and gathers in the main area.  Alex, this year’s president is starting the meeting in the center of the picture in the black sweater.  Alex briefly mentioned club business which included donations, classes, finances, the need for 6″ duct for the CNC machine, etc.  Brandon, in the red sweatshirt, reported the results of a recent survey: the favorite part of the club is the social aspect, the least liked aspect was that some of the tools are broken.

The last thing they do in the meeting is have everyone introduce themselves, share their interests, and update what they are currently working on.  There were several asks and offers for assistance, it was very cool.  When each person was done they said “Bam” and pointed at the next one  – I don’t  know if that always happens or if it was organic but that type of self organization was really effective.  The meetings are similar to but not as formal as the monthly Chibots meetings if you are familiar with those.

Also pictured above on the left is Ben, or as he jokingly asked to be called “That Bastard Ben”.  On the right with the beard and plaid shirt is John W. who is repairing is repairing and/or enhancing the electric scooter behind him on the right.



John M. is on the left, Nick in the orange shirt works on FPGAs’ and is really sharp.

There was one more really interesting guy I didn’t get a picture of but he suggested members check out the recent hacking/spying wikileaks CIA articles because they point out security flaws and espionage techniques used on common devices anyone could be using.  I want to be clear, he was not suggesting that anyone in the club use the exploits, it was more from the point of view of the security threat.  That was the first I had heard of that news, a day before I heard about it in the news.  He’s a really smart low level guy whose current project was analyzing the voltage/current profile of each pin of a microcontroller to try and find a way to glitch/reboot it into a programmable mode.

Oh, and Andrew…
This is Andrew and yours truly.  Andrew is making an autonomous vehicle with his one spinning single beam LiDAR system and computer vision using an onboard NVIDIA Pascal GPU (~10W GPU running deep nets!!!).  He actually works for the same company I work for, HERE, optimizing deep neural networks for visual segmentation, recognition, and other perception related tasks… and he recognized me as one of the people who interviewed him on the phone several months ago.   He studied Geology (I think) at Wheaton College before getting a degree in Physics.  MAN, SMALL WORLD!  His project is so cool, he had a case full of different single board computers including RPI, BBB, Arduino, ST based Arduino’s and more. We talked work and projects for an hour.  He introduced me to Sebastian and some of the others mentioned above.

The wood shop:

The wood shop was large enough to accommodate big projects, and was well equipped: Combo table saw/routing table, jointer, planer, compound miter saws, lathe, band saw, drill press, scroll saws, sander, and much more. That’s a ShopBot in the background with dust collection.  I also noted that the shop was swept and vacuumed.

The robotics and CNC area:



They are getting their big CNC working with Machine Kit and GeckoDrive G540.  It’s funny because Workshop 88 is going through the same process using Machine Kit and Gecko drives for our mill.  Tom in the red sweater asked what a “Charge Pump” is and I happened to know 🙂


Brandon is about to CNC machine a new aluminum part on the Taig behind him needed by the larger mill to the left.  It’s also using MachineKit, and note the electronics for the mill in the box mounted to the wall behind Plexiglas.  I didn’t find out what the actual part he was machining was.

Robot

This robot was there, I don’t know what if anything it was for but it was cool.  I particularly like the design with most of the motors low in the base and belt drive up and through the joints.


This is their Chinese Laser cutter / engraver.  It was not working at the time I visited.


Those 4 3D printers were donated by LulzBot.  I swear at least some, if not all look to me to be Prusa Mendel or Mendel Max.  Each needed some repair.

This is the electronics lab:
Here are a couple more 3D printers, that look to be in good working order.
Mike S. on the left wearing the hat, Mike W, and Alex working on something, probably Mike W.’s scooter.  In the meeting, Mike S. shared his current project: electronic control of the exhaust fan on his fireplace which he can now remotely monitor and graph the temperature of his fireplace and the running of his fireplace exhaust fan on his phone.


I love a good whiteboard!


Another room with test equipment.


It’s hard to see but the Boy Scout motto: “Leave No Trace” was once written in red marker on the well used bench.
Another friendly clean up reminder.

All in all a great club full of interesting talented people working on fascinating projects.  It was nice to see they face some of the same organizational challenges, and I like they way they incorporate a regular club meeting with introductions and project updates into their open house night.

I’m really glad I made the time to visit and when I go back to Boulder you can bet that I’ll  aim to be there on a Tuesday night to go to another meeting at Solid State Depot.

D. Scott Williamson
Compulsively Creative