About achmorrison

Physics professor by day - maker by night

Workshop 88 Weekly Maker Night – October 27,2020

Introduction – Workshop 88 is a makerspace in Glen Ellyn Illinois. We are more than a workshop, we are a growing community of creative talented people who aspire to learn and share their insights, experiences, and projects.

This is the first ever Workshop 88 Makers Round-table on Zoom where we plan to share our projects, ideas, and related resources. The attendees and agenda are below, the meeting will be recorded and hosted on YouTube, and resources like links and other related information can be found here after the event.

Attendees

  • Andrew Morrison
  • Scott Williamson
  • Jim Williams
  • Tom Matukas

Show and tell time!

Each session will target 10 minutes for show and tell and 5 minutes for Q&A

7:05pm – Scott Williamson to share FPV (First-person view) drone insights, including his 3D printed Peon230 hand built drone, tiny HD “Whoop” drone, transmitter, goggles, headset, display, and an overview of the hardware and software components including Betaflight configurator and black box.

7:20pm – Jim Williams <show and tell or shop tour>

7:35pm – Tom Matukas – Covid-19 laser choir project overview

Tonight’s discussion topics

7:50pm – Incomplete, abandoned, and bucket list projects

8:15pm – Dealing with Joy-Con Drift – Can I replace the joystick myself with a kit? (Tips, tricks and confidence building aka moral support)

Open Discussion

8:30pm

Meeting notes

  • YouTube link to this event: tbd
  • Resources
    • Drones
      • tbd
  • Retrospective:
    • Repeat? weekly, fortnightly, monthly?
    • How to better manage and announce the agenda? (post or page?)
    • How to manage the growing backlog of topics and segment ideas

Please subscribe to Workshop88’s YouTube page, like us on facebook, and join or support our maker community by contributing to our Patreon.

Quick project video

Some of the Workshop 88 members have been working on a system for allowing multiple people to sing together while maintaining social distancing requirements. Without giving too much away right now, let’s just say that there has been a lot of discussion between members about transmitting sound via laser. Above is a very simple project demonstrating this process.

If you’re interested in hearing about these projects, please join us on Thursday nights via Zoom – details are on our meetup page!

Workshop 88 open house tours are suspended through end of April

Due to the governor’s order to stay at home through the end of April, Workshop 88 will continue our suspension of  public open house tours on Thursday nights.

We would still like to meet makers and connect with you! Please see our Meetup page for information on how you may interact with us including virtual tours and virtual open house visits on Thursday nights.

Favorite 3D prints: painting pyramid

Painting pyramid you can print!

One of our members shared this clever painting pyramid model that you can download from thingiverse for 3D printing.

A painting pyramid is used to elevate a work piece off of your workbench after painting to allow the work to dry. These pyramids are stackable, for easy storage between use. Additionally, these are way cheaper to print than to buy in a store.

If you do painting or staining of your projects, you should try out these painting pyramids. Share your work with us – we love to see other people’s projects!

Favorite 3D prints: phone stands

At Workshop 88 a lot of our members create their own designs for things they want to 3D print. But there is a great variety of models designed by other people available for download on thingiverse.

One of our members recommended a phone/tablet stand that prints all in one piece in place:

You can download this phone stand model from thingiverse. There are a few remixes of this thing which you might also want to check out.

A cautionary tale for 3d-printing with glass beds

Several of our members have had great success with using glass beds to do their 3D printing on. (We even have a tutorial on how to cut glass for those who are interested!)

Recently one of our members shared that one of her 3d prints stuck a little too well to the bed and then the bed chipped when trying to pull the print off.

Chip out of a glass bed.
Chip stuck on a 3d printed part.

The filament used was PLA, and the bed was prepped with a bit of hairspray before printing. Other members here at Workshop 88 use isopropyl alcohol to prep their printer beds before printing with PLA.

The advantage of using glass is that the surface is extremely flat and smooth. Just let this be a cautionary tale that there is some risk of chipping the glass if the print adheres too much. But if you know how to cut glass yourself, you can always make a new one!