New class: Programming a Tiny85 with Arduino

Tiny85: a simple, cheap alternative to dedicating an Arduino to a long-term project

ATtiny85 - Image credit: Atmel

Atmel offers several processor chips in the same family as the Arduino’s ATMega328P that are often perfect for a simple permanent controller. This class introduces you to the ATTiny85, with mention of some others. You’ll leave with an ’85 running a simple blinkie with code you wrote, you ported to Tiny85, and you burned into the ’85 along with a mini shield to use an Arduino as a programmer for the ’85 and many other Atmel chips.

The class is open to Arduino users with at least basic programming skills. (You’ll need to be able to modify the Blink sketch.) You’ll need to bring a working Arduino (or clone), a laptop with the Arduino 1.0.4 development environment, and a breadboard. We’ll supply a Tiny85.

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Introduction to Arduino class (Arduino 101) Saturday April 6, 2013

Workshop 88 is offering our introduction to the Arduino platform at our makerspace in Glen Ellyn.

This class is for anyone who wants to learn how to get started with the arduino microcontroller, regardless of experience with programming or electronics.

Class attendees will learn how to configure their arduino programming environment, how to design simple circuits for interfacing with the arduino and how to write simple programs to control the arduino. What is Arduino, you ask? From their home page:

Arduino is an open-source electronics prototyping platform based on flexible, easy-to-use hardware and software. It’s intended for artists, designers, hobbyists, and anyone interested in creating interactive objects or environments.

If you need to get an arduino, please see the Workshop 88 Arduino Store. Sales from that store are fulfilled by amazon.com, and help support Workshop 88. Alternatively, you can order Arduino systems from several places, including Adafruit and Sparkfun. Both companies have lots of tutorials and howtos to get you started with Arduinos. If you’re looking for a local source to get Arduinos, try Trossen Robotics.

What you’ll get from this class: If you choose the registration + materials option, we will have an arduino and assortment of electronics components for you to take home after the class. (The Workshop 88 Arduino Store is by far a cheaper route to get supplies.)

In this class you will learn how to start programming in the Arduino environment including interacting with the inputs and outputs of the Arduino.You should bring: a laptop with the Arduino environment downloaded and installed.  Please contact us (info@workshop88.com) if you have any questions. Image credit: By Linuswiki (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

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Welcome, Hackaday readers!

Hey, we’re featured on hackaday today!

If you’re a hackaday reader just learning about Workshop 88, please feel free to connect with us online:

Email list – join our  Google group – You must subscribe to this to see the messages. (We approve everyone who is not a spambot.)

Twitter – Follow @Workshop88

Facebook – like us on Facebook

Meetup – If you are local to the the Chicago area, follow our schedule of all we do at our Meetup page.

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Workshop 88 walk-through at public meeting

Two of the questions we often get at Workshop 88 are: “How many people show up to your public meeetings?” and “What usually goes on at your public meetings?”

If you’ve been wondering the same things about Workshop 88, take a look at what was going on during our last meeting:

If you’ve never been to Workshop 88 before, the video gives a sense of how the makerspace is laid out.  We have four areas from front to back: meeting room, wood/metal shop, electronics/rapid prototype lab, and multimedia room. All the rooms get a lot of use; it just happened that when the video was shot there were not many people in the back rooms.

Come out some night and make something with us!

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WOYB – Prototyping arduino sensors

Workshop 88 member Jim Williams shared these breadboard photos for our “What’s on Your Breadboard series

This board had a electret microphone with preamp on it, for use in an arduino class that we ran. As you can see, he eventually put the circuit onto a PCB.

Image credit: Jim Williams

Image credit: Jim Williams

The second breadboard shows that sometimes a breadboard is just a convenient way to connect one sensor to an arduino. In this case, it was an ultrasonic rangefinder that Jim wanted to test with the arduino. He reported that it worked well.

Image credit: Jim Williams

Image credit: Jim Williams

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Learning Python Programming for non-programmers

Python is a cross-platform programming language which is a popular choice for novice and advanced programmers. The design of python emphasizes the readability of code, making it easier for beginning programmers to learn.

In this class we will look at the basic framework of python programming and explore how to begin to design programs in python.

Who this class is for: People who are NOT trained programmers, but are interested in getting started with learning python. This class is OPEN to the public. You do not have to be a member of Workshop 88 to attend.

What you should bring to the class: Your own laptop on which you should download and install one of the stable versions of python from the python website.

What you will get from the class: understanding of the python interpreter, how python classes are used, a basic understanding of how to write programs in python

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