About D. Scott Williamson

Compulsively Creative

Maker Meeting December 29, 2020

Check out the December 29, 2020 Workshop 88 Maker Meeting here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D6PLhZxu954

For details (including recipes and pictures) see details on the December 29 Workshop 88 Maker Meeting page:
http://blog.workshop88.com/maker-meeting-december-29-2020-detail/

We have great things planned for the first meeting in 2021 including the design, machining, and construction of Tom’s spring loaded engraver and a considerable discussion on the topic of organization!


Workshop 88 is a makerspace in Glen Ellyn Illinois. We are more than a workshop, we are a growing community of creative talented people who aspire to learn and share knowledge, experiences, and projects.

Join us! To become a member join at Workshop88 or you can help us continue to share our projects and activities by supporting us via Patreon.

Never miss a tip or project! Follow our blog at www.Workshop88.com, subscribe to Workshop88’s YouTube channel, like us on Facebook, follow us Twitter and join or support our maker community by contributing to Workshop88 on Patreon!

To find out about upcoming events follow Workshop88 on Meetup.
Have a question? email us at info@Workshop88.com

Maker Meeting December 22, 2020

Check out the December 22, 2020 Workshop 88 Maker Meeting here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y_iZNCfRGe8

This week’s episode featured:

More details and links can be found on the December 22, 2020 Maker Meeting Workshop 88 page.


Workshop 88 is a makerspace in Glen Ellyn Illinois. We are more than a workshop, we are a growing community of creative talented people who aspire to learn and share knowledge, experiences, and projects.

Join us! To become a member join at Workshop88 or you can help us continue to share our projects and activities by supporting us via Patreon.

Never miss a tip or project! Follow our blog at www.Workshop88.com, subscribe to Workshop88’s YouTube channel, like us on Facebook, follow us Twitter and join or support our maker community by contributing to Workshop88 on Patreon!

To find out about upcoming events follow Workshop88 on Meetup.
Have a question? email us at info@Workshop88.com

Maker Meeting December 15th, 2020

Workshop 88 Maker Meeting, December 15th, 2020: YouTube link

This Week’s Topics & Discussions

Meeting notes

About Workshop 88

Workshop 88 is a makerspace in Glen Ellyn Illinois. We are more than a workshop, we are a growing community of creative talented people who aspire to learn and share knowledge, experiences, and projects.

Join us! To become a member join at Workshop88 or you can help us continue to share our projects and activities by supporting us via Patreon.

Never miss a tip or project! Follow our blog at www.Workshop88.com, subscribe to Workshop88’s YouTube channel, like us on Facebook, follow us Twitter and join or support our maker community by contributing to Workshop88 on Patreon!

To find out about upcoming events follow Workshop88 on Meetup.
Have a question? email us at info@Workshop88.com

Melamine or chipboard drawer face repair

Last week I shut one of my shop drawers loaded with sandpaper and manuals with a too much “gusto” which ripped the drawer face off and left large deep pits in the chipboard around the mounting screws. Here is how I fixed it.

Aw shucks!

This is the broken drawer, you can see how the 4 mounting screws ripped deep holes out of the Melamine chipboard drawer front.

For this repair you will need:

  • Eye protection
  • Pen or pencil
  • Ruler (preferably long)
  • Saw, container, and sieve (or sawdust)
  • Wood glue
  • Wire brush (optional)
  • Clamps (screw clamps and hand clamps used in the example)
  • Scrap wood to protect your surfaces from clamps
  • Screwdriver suitable for your existing drawer screws
  • Paper (sticker backing, baking parchment, or waxed paper is best)
  • Popsicle stick or similar spreader
  • Disposable cup or other container
  • Sharp chisel or sandpaper (optional)

Wearing eye protection, clean out the holes. You can compressed air, or you can pucker up and blow them out with your own compressed air but be sure to close your eyes and wear eye protection, sawdust and debris is nearly guaranteed to blow right into your eyes with this method (voice of experience). Alternatively you can gently clean them out with a brush with the holes facing downward.

Next, mark lines through the centers of the screw holes around each pit. This step is important for getting the screw holes located later in the repair so the drawer front is aligned and spaced properly so take your time. I found using a long ruler lined up with the centers of pairs of holes horizontally, vertically, and diagonally to mark the area around each repair worked well. If you use a permanent marker as I have take note which areas of the back of the drawer face will be visible when reassembled. It may be useful to look at other drawers to get an idea of what areas will be visible. If you use a pencil or erasable marker (dry erase, grease pencil) be careful not to erase your marks later when working in the area.

Next you will need sawdust. I grabbed a piece of scrap plywood, clamped it in the vice and started cutting from the end. After 3 cuts I felt I had enough. You want the sawdust pretty fine, no chunks or splinters so I sieved it.

Now it’s time to make our own chipboard filler and fill the holes. I mixed up a little at a time so I could get the consistency I wanted and so the batch wouldn’t get too gummy while working. Start with glue in a disposable container. I used a plastic cup but it can be any container as long as it is clean. I start with glue, add sawdust which will absorb some of the moisture of the glue and mix. I keep adding glue or sawdust until the mixture is a putty like spreadable consistency. You want it on the wet side so the glue can bond to the chipboard in the next step.

Working one hole at a time using the Popsicle stick or spreader, start pressing the filler into a hole. You want to pack it as deep as you can into the bottom without leaving voids or bubbles. The glue will shrink as the moisture evaporates during curing so mound the holes full.

Now we are going to apply some pressure with clamps. Select pieces of scrap wood to protect your surfaces from the clamps which will dent, scratch, and break the surfaces of your drawers if they are not protected. I used screw clamps, you can use whatever you have available.
Place a piece of paper over each glue filled hole. If your paper has a shiny side that side should face the glue. Place smooth wooden blocks large enough to more than cover the hole over the paper. With a second wooden block on the other side tighten each clamp. The clamp should be snug to tight, you don’t need to crush the wood, just hold it tightly together.

Leave for a two to three hours to let the pressure distribute the materials and the glue will penetrate the existing chipboard.

The glue will not cure if covered so after several hours remove the clamps and carefully remove the paper to leave as much filler as possible in the holes. Leave them overnight to dry or longer to dry and cure. They will likely take longer to cure than wood glue usually takes due to the volume of the filler.

You will probably notice that the old screw threads are full of wood. Clean them with a wire brush so they bite into the repaired drawer face without interference. If you don’t have a wire brush you may be able to clean them using the drawer body front by backing them all the way out. This step is not critical.

The next day or when you are confident all the filler has fully cured you can proceed. The filler likely contracted leaving the center slightly concave, this is OK. If you have a large void and feel you need more filler you can repeat the above steps but it is usually not necessary.

Remove any excess glue or filler on the drawer face. A sharp broad chisel worked very well for me. You can try a razor scraper or sandpaper. Assuming you don’t have any large lumps this step is optional to assure a snug smooth fit between surfaces.

Select an appropriately sized pilot hole drill bit. I typically do this by holding candidate bits behind and in front of the screw. For woodworking in solid wood I would normally select a slightly smaller bit but considering my experience with chipboard, I selected a bit that was nearly the diameter of the center of the screw leaving plenty of material for the threads to bite into.

This is a good time to create a depth gauge by wrapping your drill bit with a piece of painters tape to indicate how long the screws are (not pictured). This will allow drilling holes deep enough for the screws without drilling all the way through to the face of the drawer.

Using a ruler and sharp pencil, re-draw the lines to determine where the screw centers should be.

Carefully drill pilot holes at the screw center locations. Make sure the drill holes are perpendicular to the drawer face (not angled). Again, be careful to drill the holes deep enough for the screws but not deep enough to damage the front of the drawer face on the other side.

Back up the screws so that only the points protrude and get some hand clamps ready. We will use the screw tips to align the drawer face on the drawer and hold it in place with the clamps.

Place the drawer front on the drawer carefully locating each screw tip in one of the pilot holes you drilled. Once aligned place the hand clamps and take a moment to verify the screws are in the holes and the drawer face looks properly positioned and aligned. Take your time on this step.

Gently tighten the screws. I give each screw a couple turns with a hand screwdriver and move on to the next until they are all fully screwed in. Don’t over torque the screws, you know what they’re biting into. I advise tightening these by hand with a manual screwdriver. If you choose to use an electric screwdriver, use slow speed (screwdriver, not drill), the lowest torque setting, and still do the final tightening with a hand screwdriver.

There are a couple optional things you can do for additional strength:

  • You could drill pilot holes and add more screws into fresh material. Again, be careful to select appropriate size/length screws so you get a good bite without drilling or screwing through the face of the drawer.
  • You could apply epoxy between the faces before screwing them together for a permanent bond but you better get everything aligned perfect because there is no undoing that. (not advised)

Perfect fit! Which one was repaired?

The top drawer, ready to be re-filled.

Clean up the shop. 😉

I hope this was helpful and you picked up a tip or two.

Stay tuned here on the Workshop88 blog for more articles and updates, subscribe to Workshop88’s YouTube channel for our regular Maker Meetings and other content, like us on facebook, join or support our maker community by contributing to our Patreon (we could really use your help!).

D. Scott Williamson
Compulsively Creative

Workshop 88 Weekly Maker Night – November 17, 2020

Introduction

Workshop 88 is a makerspace in Glen Ellyn Illinois. We are more than a workshop, we are a growing community of creative talented people who aspire to learn and share their insights, experiences, and projects.

Please subscribe to Workshop88’s YouTube channel, like us on facebook, and join or support our maker community by contributing to Workshop88 on Patreon!

To find out about upcoming events follow Workshop88 on Meetup.
Do you have a question? email us at info@Workshop88.com

YouTube link: Workshop 88 Weekly Maker Meeting – Episode 3

Welcome to the Workshop 88 Makers Round-table on Zoom where we share our projects, ideas, and related resources. The attendees and agenda are below, the meeting will be recorded and hosted on YouTube, and resources like links and other related information can be found here after the event.

Attendees

  • Andrew Morrison
  • Scott Williamson
  • Jim Williams
  • Tom Matukas
  • Gail Jo Kelly
  • Daniil Bystrukhin
  • Peter Fales
  • Phil Strons
  • Karl Knutson
  • Christine Heermann

Show & tell time!

Each session will target 10 minutes for show and tell and 5 minutes for Q&A

7:00pm – Scott will share his Schlieren photography setup. Schlieren photography allows you to visualize changes in air density and used to see airflow, temperature differences, shock waves, or sound.

7:30pm – Rick will share his experiences with the STMicro accelerometer, magnetometer, and gyroscope leading into a discussion about creating a tilt compass using trigonometry.

General discussion topics

  • How would you calibrate an anemometer?
    • Jim Williams: Drive a car with it out the window on a stick to get outside of the car’s air-stream and have a copilot record rpm and car speedometer. (Scott added: In both directions to factor out a gentle breeze)
    • Mark Frost: Put it on the end of a stick and spin at a known rate in a still room to know airspeed of the sensor.
    • Scott Williamson: Connect it to the end of a tube connected to a large plastic bag. Place the bag in a box of known volume, place a second slightly smaller weighted box on top of the bag within the first box to construct a piston. Measure the time it takes to move the known outer box volume of air through the tube of known diameter to estimate the airspeed. Repeat with different weights.
  • Andrew Morrison: Why does an accelerometer measure an acceleration when it is not moving or changing velocity?
  • Rick Stewart: Laser Nanny repair
  • Did not cover: SMD soldering tips – (flux, solder paste, iron, iron tip, hot air, temps…)

Meeting notes

Please subscribe to Workshop88’s YouTube page, like us on facebook, and join or support our maker community by contributing to our Patreon.

Workshop 88 Weekly Maker Night – November 11, 2020

Introduction

Workshop 88 is a makerspace in Glen Ellyn Illinois. We are more than a workshop, we are a growing community of creative talented people who aspire to learn and share their insights, experiences, and projects.

Please subscribe to Workshop88’s YouTube channel, like us on facebook, and join or support our maker community by contributing to Workshop88 on Patreon!

To find out about upcoming events follow Workshop88 on Meetup.
Do you have a question? email us at info@Workshop88.com

Welcome to the second Workshop 88 Makers Round-table in a row on Zoom where we plan to share our projects, ideas, and related resources. The attendees and agenda are below, the meeting will be recorded and hosted on YouTube, and resources like links and other related information can be found here after the event.

Attendees

  • Andrew Morrison
  • Scott Williamson
  • Jim Williams
  • Tom Matukas
  • Gail Jo Kelly
  • Daniil Bystrukhin
  • Peter Fales
  • Phil Strons
  • Karl Knutson
  • Christine Heermann

Show & tell time!

Each session will target 10 minutes for show and tell and 5 minutes for Q&A

7:05pm – Scott recently explored Free and Open Source video editing software and will share his findings including resurrecting an antique and finding a real gem!

7:20pm – Jim will share laser cut fluorescent non-round gears

General discussion topics

  • Home Automation (ESP-01, ESP-32, Arduino, WiFi, MQTT, Mosquito, Raspberry Pi, Linux, battery/solar power…)
    • Daniil and Peter shared a lot of detailed information about the hardware, protocols, software they use to monitor and control many things around their homes – links below.
  • “What are you 3D printing?”
    • Andrew shared hexagonal tangram-like puzzle he designed in TinkerCAD and 3D printed. We discussed additional puzzles and ways to improve the puzzle and print quality.
  • “What are you making / preparing for the holidays?”

Meeting notes

Please subscribe to Workshop88’s YouTube page, like us on facebook, and join or support our maker community by contributing to our Patreon.

Workshop 88 Weekly Maker Night – November 3, 2020

VOTE!

YouTube link to this event

Introduction

Workshop 88 is a makerspace in Glen Ellyn Illinois. We are more than a workshop, we are a growing community of creative talented people who aspire to learn and share their insights, experiences, and projects.

Please subscribe to Workshop88’s YouTube channel, like us on facebook, and join or support our maker community by contributing to Workshop88 on Patreon!

To find out about upcoming events follow Workshop88 on Meetup.
Do you have a question? email us at info@Workshop88.com

Welcome to the second Workshop 88 Makers Round-table in a row on Zoom where we plan to share our projects, ideas, and related resources. The attendees and agenda are below, the meeting will be recorded and hosted on YouTube, and resources like links and other related information can be found here after the event.

Attendees

  • Andrew Morrison
  • Scott Williamson
  • Jim Williams
  • Tom Matukas
  • Gail Jo Kelley
  • Rick Stewart
  • Breezy Fasano
  • Peter Fales
  • Phil Strons

Show and tell time!

Each session will target 10 minutes for show and tell and 5 minutes for Q&A

7:00pm – Breezy will share her custom created keyboard as well as information and tips for making your own.

7:15pm Rick will share part of his MQTT / NodeRED project for monitoring outside temperature and door activity (in progress). (LED word clock will be shared in a later meeting.

730pm (Postponed)Scott recently explored Free and Open Source video editing software and will share his findings including resurrecting an antique and finding a real gem!

7:45pm Phil will share antenna constructions (Ham & HD)

Discussion topics

8:00pm GailJo – Nintendo Switch Joystick repair followup

Disassembly project tips: tweezers, pictures, screw containers… laptop failure

Meeting notes

Please subscribe to Workshop88’s YouTube page, like us on facebook, and join or support our maker community by contributing to our Patreon.

Doorknob Handle

Like many Americans, my family had a spring break vacation planned just as the Coronavirus pandemic began to spread in North America. For weeks while looking forward to spring break we had been watching the dramatic growth of COVID-19 and steps taken to contain and control the virus in China, and more recently in Italy, Iran, and South Korea. We decided to cancel our vacation and begin social distancing. While disappointed, it was immediately clear that we made the right decision for ourselves as we would have likely been stranded away from our home in the USA and for everyone else in this time of aggressive spread of a highly infectious disease that hospitalizes 1 in 10 and kills 1 in 50 people.

We made our decision on Saturday the day before our flight was to leave, we all thought about social distancing and what we should do to protect ourselves and potentially others from us (two of us had recent colds and were uncertain if we caught it and symptoms were mild). Hand washing, not touching our faces, sanitizing everything around us were discussed, but when I found out that COVID-19 could last an astonishing 3 days on metal and plastic surfaces I immediately noticed all the doorknobs in our house. A doorknob you have to grasp with hour hand requiring a lot of contact, a door handle you can open with your elbow, or at least one finger. After you’ve been out in public touching door handles, railings, shopping carts, elevator buttons, ATM’s, money, gas pumps… You have to touch the exterior doorknob to enter the house before you are able to wash your hands, and everyone needs to touch it.

I also felt like I wanted to do something to help. I decided to design and share a customizable 3D printable handle that could be easily and nondestructively be attached to doorknobs. Not only are they more sanitary, but they turned out to be immensely convenient when carrying in groceries, or walking out with a beverage, etc. Below are links to my models and source code on Thingiverse, along with the write-up that accompanies them.

Updated stronger customizable doorknob handle with more options: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4228668
Note: Thingiverse customizer does not work with this model, it may be too complicated. Download Knob handle v5.scad*, open in OpenSCAD, and enable the Cusomizer UI in the View menu.

Original door handle: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4224517

Unfortunately this was inspired by Coronavirus COVID-19

If you think these may help you, your family, or others, please feel free to customize and print as many as needed.

If you would like to manufacture and commercialize this product please contact me, we can work something out.

Novel Coronavirus or COVID-19 is spread like cold and flu viruses via contact with droplets (sneezes, coughs) from an infected individual. It has been proven viable in the air for 3 hours and has been demonstrated to contaminate surfaces for up to 3 days where it may be picked up on hands. A potential vector for infection is touching your face (mouth, nose, or eyes) with the virus on your hands. Frequent thorough hand washing with soap and water and minimizing touching your face are suggested ways to reduce the likelihood of contracting the Novel Coronavirus COVID-19 infection.

Centers for Disease Control: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/transmission.html

The use of round doorknobs require a hand to grasp and twist to open a door. Entry and exit doors in particular must be touched by everyone entering a household, are usually touched before having access to a sink, and after potentially touching public handles, railings, shopping carts, elevator buttons, ATM’s, money, gas pumps, rest rooms… Doors with handles can be opened with elbows and forearms which are less likely to relay infection.

This handle is easy to print and clamps firmly, gently, and non-destructively to round doorknobs.

An added bonus: Handles are easier to open while carrying packages, groceries, or beverages!

Styles

There are two styles, flat (push) and curved (pull).

The flat version will likely print more easily and is perfectly fine for doors that push open.

The curved version is tailored for doors that need to be pulled and in general is more universal.

I can open our doors inside and out with my elbows, but even if you can’t get your elbow in there, at least you can limit exposure to one finger rather your whole hand grabbing a doorknob.

You can customize the length, style, size of the doorknob and more in the OpenSCAD parameters in the file (even more if you dig into the code – have fun!).

Fitting

The default size is 54mm diameter, 23mm thick doorknob. The model can accommodate slightly larger and smaller sizes as is.

To fit your doorknob you may either scale the STL file before printing (measure your doorknob diameter D and scale by D/54), or adjust the parameters in OpenSCAD, render (F6), save STL, and print your customized model.

Installation

The door handle may be installed horizontally but I like ours elevated (rotated “up”) 30-50 degrees to provide more of a usable rotation arc with my elbow.

Attach to doorknob

  1. Slip handle over your doorknob, it should fit snug but not crack
  2. Fasten with a machine screw or bolt (M3, 4-40, 2-56, or anything that will fit)
    • Lock nuts are preferred to regular nuts
    • Use of washers on both sides is recommended to distribute forces
  3. If snug enough, it may work fine without a screw
  4. Optional: If your handle slips, you can slip or wrap a rubber band between the doorknob and the ring before tightening the screw. You do not need to put the rubber band around the doorknob (that would be very difficult), it just needs to compress the rubber against the doorknob in one location to improve grip. Alternately, (more easily) you could wrap a rubber band around one arm of the handle ring prior to installation as pictured, but the rubber band will be visible once installed.

Note, there should be enough friction to open the door with your elbow or knee
but the plastic handle may not be able to grab the smooth metal doorknob with enough force to secure it against any force without slipping. Simply slide it back to the original position or you can try installing a rubber band for more “gription“.

Conclusion

I will never know, but I hope this is helpful. I hope this has a chance of preventing at least one person from getting sick – even if it is not against Coronavirus, perhaps against one of the 200 viruses known to cause the common cold, or influenza (8,200 deaths in US in 2019), or Norovirus…

Maybe you just want to make it easier to bring in your groceries.

If you would like to support invention for the greater good, you can donate to your local makerspace… or mine: http://blog.workshop88.com/
http://blog.workshop88.com/membership/#donations
(they will need support during these times of social distancing and isolation)

Also, please don’t judge my filthy garage/workshop doors too harshly… I have to go scrub them now.

Stay well, wash your hands, and don’t touch your face!

D. Scott Williamson
Compulsively Creative

Workshop 88 Open House

May 16, 2019

Workshop 88 has an open house every Thursday from 7:00pm – 9:00pm where we welcome visitors and give shop tours. If you would like to see what’s available and what’s going on at your local makerspace or if you’d like to talk about a project you have in mind, come check us out!

As a result, Thursdays also are typically our most social night too. This week we had members working on many interesting projects including metal casting preparation, 3D printing, CNC milling, electronics, and more.

Here’s a look…

More projector fun! (see previous blog post for more details)

3D printing a space ship model to create a mold for a bronze casting

Bronze casting from the PLA model.

Meanwhile GailJo was 3D printing weatherproof sign components for illuminated Workshop 88 signs. The signs were so effective someone stopped by to check us out within 2 hours of them being placed!

I love when we have two or more 3D printers working at the same time. If you’re curious about 3D printing check out our step by step tutorial here.

Cutting up bronze casting scraps so they fit in the crucible for another casting. We used the band saw, bolt cutters, a ball peen hammer, and a vise. Copper is soft, tin is soft, mix them together you get bronze. Bronze is hard… really hard.

Jim is working on stepper motor driver electronics for a kinetic sculpture.

CNC’ing a cubic hole in a graphite block to be a mold for a future silver cube casting.

(Actually hybrid manual/CNC control in this case.)

All are welcome, we hope to see you one of these Thursday nights!

Custom Workshop 88 Projector

Tonight at CNC Build Club we discussed the enclosure for the MPCNC electronics and while Tom continued to work on the design and GailJo was busy 3D printing pieces for Workshop 88 signs, I (Scott) experimented with new projector inserts for GailJo’s holiday projector.


I found some transparencies and using the Workshop 88 logo I grabbed off this website I printed a few sizes.

I found the one closest in size to the images included with the projector, cut it out, and installed it.

Voilà! It worked perfectly!

We grabbed a long extension cord, took it outside, and projected it on everything. Fun!