WOYB – big LEDs

Image credit: Doug Bradbury

Image credit: Doug Bradbury

Workshop 88 member Doug Bradbury showed off a simple “stoplight LED” project that he had on a breadboard as a leftover project for work done for a client. Thanks, Doug!

What’s on your breadboard?

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WOYB – Prototyping arduino sensors

Workshop 88 member Jim Williams shared these breadboard photos for our “What’s on Your Breadboard series

This board had a electret microphone with preamp on it, for use in an arduino class that we ran. As you can see, he eventually put the circuit onto a PCB.

Image credit: Jim Williams

Image credit: Jim Williams

The second breadboard shows that sometimes a breadboard is just a convenient way to connect one sensor to an arduino. In this case, it was an ultrasonic rangefinder that Jim wanted to test with the arduino. He reported that it worked well.

Image credit: Jim Williams

Image credit: Jim Williams

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WOYB – Intervalometer

DSCN0002 SmallOne of our newest friends of Workshop 88, Lewis, posted this awesome project he’s prototyping on the breadboard.  It’s an intervalometer for a camera. Here’s how Lew described it:

“The camera is too new to hack, so I made a holder out of 1/8” plywood for an RC servo that would slip onto the camera body and could be held in position with a couple of thumbscrews.  An Arduino micro controls the servo and handles the timing.  The project is still in the breadboard stage.  I’ll probably add an LCD and either an encoder or joystick switch so that I can change the time interval when I’m on the road.”

 

Thanks, Lew!  What’s on your breadboard?

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WOYB – Tiny85 BlingBoard

Workshop 88 member Jim Williams shared a few of his breadboards with us for our WOYB feature.  Here’s one:

Image credit: Jim Williams

Image credit: Jim Williams

He says: “This is the proto for a Tiny85 “bling board”, trying to run as much stuff as possible on a Tiny85. It will be the opening demo for the Tiny85 class (which will actually happen Real Soon Now).”

Stay tuned for details on that class!

What’s on Your Breadboard?

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New feature: What’s on your breadboard? (WOYB)

Every maker that dabbles in electronics has a breadboard or two (or three, or fourteen) with current and prior projects on them.  In the spirit of sharing with our community, we asked on the email list a simple question: “What’s on your breadboard?”

Over the next few days, we’re going to feature some of the replies here on the blog.

First up is Workshop 88 member Karl who shared a photo of his breadboard with an array of LEDs on it. His project is developing a countdown timer with a visual representation given by the LEDs. He pointed out the button which never seems to stay on the breadboard.

Image credit: Karl Knutson

Image credit: Karl Knutson

Thanks for sharing, Karl!

What’s on your breadboard?

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More on the toroid “cheat” hack

Remember Jim’s toroid hack that he posted here last week?  It was featured on hackaday, which was really cool to see.

Jim updated his post to his own blog to include some measurements of the effect of breaking the magnet to get the wire wrapped on to it.

He used a simple RL circuit to measure the inductance of the toroid. Very neat to see some values to compare the glued vs. unbroken magnets.

Thanks, Jim!

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Toroid winding

Inspired by Kirk and the Kobayashi Maru, when Jim was faced with the near-impossible task of winding hundreds of turns of wire through a toroid core, he cheated. :)

By cleanly breaking the core in half and gluing one half to a spindle chucked in an electric drill, the winding became fairly easy.  Super gluing the halves together afterward produced a magnetically and physically sound toroid again.

Several folks at the space helped Jim with his experiment, holding wire, counting turns, operating the drill, and of course taking pictures.  Many thanks to Ti Leggett for his efforts and skills as the photographer.  There are more details in Jim’s project notes, but here’s the video:

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3D Sears Tower project

New members John and his son came to Workshop 88 yesterday for the Arduino 101 class.  Before class they started printing a model of the Sears Tower that they had designed on their own in Sketchup.

The scale of the model is such that each floor is 1 mm tall. Pretty cool!

Sears Tower modelSears Tower model

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Shapeoko plots!

Our shapeoko has produced its first output under control of g-code!  It’s taped up on the refrigerator at the space. :)

Inkscape converted a bitmap of the logo to a .svg, the  gcodetools extension generated g-code, and vi did the final modifications. :) The .svg needs a little cleanup, but it was more than adequate for this first test.

We now have a profile that’s calibrated to within a few percent for X, Y, and Z, though there’s still work on max speeds and accelerations.  This plot was made with a ballpoint pen in a very crude holder.  The bitmap-to-path converter generated inside and outside paths for the lines, so the mismatch of the actual plotted paths gives us some insight into opportunities for mechanical improvement of the shapeoko/penholder system.  While the penholder is responsible for some of the tracking errors, we still have a lot to do to tighten up the shapeoko.  The plate joining the Y and Z axes wobbles surprisingly.  But it’s starting to work!

Update 10/2/12: Using the very convenient test facilities of the axis setup in linuxcnc’s stepconf tool, I maximized travel speed on all 3 axes.  The shapeoko1 profile is getting pretty usable.  Here’s a little real time clip of it plotting.  This one used a Sharpie, and even though it only stayed in one spot while the Z axis raised or lowered the pen, the paper bled the ink into very noticeable dots every time it stopped.

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