Winfield Library Build-A-Flute Workshop

Workshop 88 led a workshop on 7/11/17 for the Winfield Public Library Young Adult Services called Science of Sound. The students built flutes (more like recorders) out of PVC tubing and pieces of wooden dowel. The flutes worked quite well, and the students had a good time.

There’s a LOT of information on the web about PVC flutes, up to and including some “flutomat” pages with interactive spreadsheets for finger hole placement. Who knew?

In preparing for the workshop by making a couple of flutes at home, it quickly became clear that it was often easier to get a flute to sound the first overtone than the fundamental we’d be shooting for. To set the stage for discussing that as the student flutes made their first noises, the presentation started out talking about natural vibration modes, with demos of guitar string harmonics, vibrating strips of metal, and a 15-foot “jumprope” with standing wave loops up to the 4th harmonic.

In discussions at W88 before the class, Rachel pointed out that decorating the flutes would be important to some students. Colorful duct tape, provided by both W88 and the library, proved that suggestion to be quite true, despite the stodgy old teacher never even considering it. Thankfully, we have a community to help rip off blinders!

Those discussions also resulted in scope creeping from the initial plan of just showing that drilling a hole or 2 could change the pitch of the flute. The final class version used a traditional six hole fingering scheme that played fairly well in tune into the second register – a few notes above an octave. Thanks to this flutomat for the hole spacings!

CAD CAM tutorial

CAD CAM tutorial
by D.  Scott Williamson

This tutorial will show you how to use Computer Aided Design and Computer Aided Manufacturing or CAD CAM tools to create and preview a Gcode file of the Workshop 88 logo that can be run in a 3 axis CNC Mill.

Background

There are 5 main types of machine operations

  1. Engrave (follow path): The tool tip will follow the 3D path provided.
  2. Profile: The tool edge will follow either the inside or outside contour of a path down to the specified depth.
  3. Pocket: The tool will remove all the material within a contour down to the specified depth.
  4. Drill: A drill routine will be executed at each point location.  Drill routines come in 2 flavors:
    1. “Peck” used with drill bits, drills to successively deeper depths liftig the bit out of the work regularly to clear chips from the flutes.
    2. “Spiral” used with endmills that are a smaller diameter than the finished hole.
  5. 3D relief: The tool tip will remove material above a 3D surface usually specified in a 3D model or a 2D height map image.  There are two main modes:
    1. “Waterline” similar to inverted pocket operations where bulk material is efficiently removed outside the 3D model to a number of stepped depths resembling waterline in a topological map.  Typically used in a first pass with a large roughing bit to remove the bulk of the material.
    2. “Raster” moves the tip of the bit smoothly over the model in a raster pattern.

Gcode is a “numerically controlled programming language” which is why a Gcode file extension is typically .nc.  It is a human and machine readable text file.  You will rarely if ever need to look at or edit the Gcode.

Overview

This tutorial will demonstrate Engrave, Profile, and Pocket operations, which are the most popular.

There are 4 steps to this tutorial:

  1. Create a .svg file containing paths needed for machine operations
  2. Create machine operations
  3. Export Gcode
  4. Simulate, visualize and validate

Continue reading

Tesla Coil demonstration on September 17!

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Workshop 88 member Phil Strons will be giving a demonstration of his Tesla coil at Workshop 88 this coming Saturday, September 17th, from 1:00 to 5:00pm.

Here’s what Phil has to say about what to expect from this demonstration: “Last year I had 20-inch sparks, but I’ve since done some modifications & repairs. I’m hoping for closer to 30-inch long sparks this time.”
WARNING – This device generates electric fields with high voltages of 1,000,000 Volts or more and has potential to interfere with medical devices such as pacemakers.

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W88 at Southland Mini Maker Faire

Andrew+Kids5559Andrew and Jim represented Workshop 88 at the Southland Mini Maker Faire in Mokena August 27th.  That Faire is run by Jay Margalus, one of Workshop 88’s founders.

Andrew’s workshop for kids to create their own hand-dipped paint-film artworks was a big hit, with dozens of delighted artists taking home their masterpieces.  Foam balls were the canvas; a bucket of water was the studio.

spray_paint_1024AThe technique, invented by Andrew using a film of spray paint on a tub of water, was inspired by a similar approach he’d seen using nail polish.  Less-than-perfect results with the polish caused him to test and perfect the paint approach.  Results were spectacular.

The laser toys box was there, as TrayAndLizardsCq65vvhW8AADHjVusual, and its Escher lizards provided entertainment and education for many little (and not-so little!) hands.  Having the back sides of the laser-cut pieces engraved with three different patterns provided an additional level of challenge based on the 3-way tessellation as a 3 color map problem.  The laser engraved wording on what used to be the bottom of the tray used to be obscured by the toys.  With the addition of the new slightly smaller lower box, that old tray is now both a useful top cover and a convenient display card!

GearsCq6wHU5XgAAxTWC-600Jim’s UV-lit fluorescent non-round gears caused lots of folks to stop and take a look.  Their graceful turning, speeding up, slowing down, reversing and repeating mesmerized a few visitors.  Their stepper controller and Tiny85 processor mostly worked, but required some discreet wiggling several times to keep it all going.  The flaky solderless breadboard that hosted them has since been replaced by a much more reliable dedicated PCB.

Display+TabletHis hexagonal WS2812 individually addressable RGB LED wall display made its debut as an actual interactive device at this Faire.  Controlled by a 16-button app on an Android tablet, connected via Bluetooth to a cheap radio on the Arduino that runs the display, the display was fun to make dancing patterns with to music from a small sound system on the table.  Next upgrade will be a better drum pad app with velocity and aftertouch, and lots more controls.

Thanks and a tip of the W88 hat to Drew Fustini for some of these pictures!

 

At Southland Mini Maker Faire

W88Table3412Workshop 88 had a table at the Southland Mini Maker Faire in Mokena on 8/22/15.  Jim’s drawbot string plotter made a “big” hit, standing 6 feet above the table and drawing poster-size images.

The drawbot, a junkbox project inspired by Bill Paulson, is driven by a couple of $3 steppers from American Science and Surplus, some cheap H bridges and an Arduino clone.  Software is free from Makelangelo.com.  It does the heavy lifting math to convert from X-Y coordinates to the “inches of string” coordinates the polar geometry imposes on its steppers.  In addition to accepting normal X-Y gcode, it can take a jpeg image and use the traveling salesman algorithm to generate a single path reflecting the darkness of different areas in the image as it’s doing in the picture above.  Such a path is ideal for a plotter that doesn’t have pen lift capability.  Yet.

THOTCON 0x5 Badge Revealed

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THOTCON  is the annual, small venue, hacking conference based in Chicago IL, USA. THOTCON is a non-profit, non-commercial event looking to provide the best conference possible on a very limited budget.

For the past 2 years Workshop 88 has been honored to design and produce the electronic attendee badges for the conference as a service to the local community.  The badge crew this year consisted of: Paul Reich, Bill Paulson, Karl Knutson, Zach Cassity, Russell Lankenau, and Rudy Ristich

This year’s badge was inspired by portable gaming systems from the past and featured  102 x 64 pixel graphic LCD screen and a push button interface. Once again, the badge features an Atmel AVR based microcontroller. The badge used nearly every byte of the 32k available SRAM on its Atmega32u4 chip.  The software consisted of a Break-out style game which participants could play to passtime, a complete schedule of talks and labs for the day long conference,  and the ability to patch into arcade panels hosted in the Hacker Village, and a few surprises for discovering inside.

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Just like the THOTCON 0x4 Badge, the 0x5 Badge is compatible with the Arduino open hardware programming environment and can accept standard Arduino shields. This means the badge can be easily reused and repurposed to power any sort of project. An improvement from last year’s badge is that no additional parts need to be added; conference goers can simply plug the badge into their laptop once burning a bootloader to reprogram it, encouraging easier exploration and badge hacking.

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The badge is designed to be completely open hardware and software.  Workshop 88 would like to thank the open source hardware and software community especially: Arduino, Oliver Kraus and other contributors to the U8glib graphics library, Dean Camera for the LUFA Project, and last, but far from least: Twisted Traces, our local assembly partner in Elk Grove, IL.

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Workshop 88 will be holding a badge hacking contest throughout the month of May.  Judging will consist of a panel from Workshop 88 and the THOTCON crew.  Interested contestants can register on the badge website: http://badge.workshop88.com

Full details on the badge specifications and firmware will be released on May 1st in conjunction with the opening of the badge hacking contest.

3D printing demos with our Cupcake

We’ve been getting more and more requests for 3D printer demos lately.  Inspired by not wanting to disappoint kids who didn’t even have their first iPad back in the days when it W88LogoRWB1348was magic to be able to 3D print anything – like when our Makerbot Cupcake was hot stuff – Jim has been trying to get the old printer working again.  This W88 logo is one of the latest results.  Not bad for an old 1-color printer!  (Thanks to Bill for the color change tips.)

Its output is no match for current “appliance” 3D printers, but it’s still fine to show the basics in a nice noisy demo.  Details of Jim’s adventures with the printer are captured here.

Bart Dring talks LinuxCNC and BeagleBone Black

Bart's Delta Router - Probably not going to be there on Saturday, but look at how awesome it is!

Bart’s Delta Router – Not going to be there on Saturday, but look at how awesome it is!

Bart Dring of MakerSlide fame is going to be out at Workshop 88 on Saturday, March 1 demonstrating CNC concepts and giving a brief talk about how he has constructed several CNC builds.  This talk immediately follows Arduino 301: Controlling The World, so come out for both! He has designed and built many great tools, such as a laser cutter, several types of 3D printers, including delta style printers. One of his most recent creations is a delta-style CNC router. Very cool! We look forward to having Bart out at Workshop 88 to share his expertise.

This event is FREE and OPEN to everyone! Please come out and bring a friend.

 

THOTCON Badge Hacking Contest Begins!

We’ve all had a full week to recover from the THOTCON and B-sides activity here in Chicago and it is time to get back to hacking.    The badge that was distributed to THOTCON attendees was designed to be hacked and reused in your projects. In the spirit of badge hacking we’d like to announce our first badge hacking contest for the attendees of THOTCON 0x4.

The contest will start today and will run until 11:59 pm CT on Monday, May 27th 2013.

The rules are simple: In hacking there are no rules.

Although there are no rules your submission must be reproducible and should include:

  1. Video Demonstration of your Badge Hack
  2. Any applicable schematics for your hack
  3. Any code and compile instructions

In the interest of collaborative learning any requested information about the badge for the purpose of the contest will be shared with other contest participants. All contest submissions will also be archived on the official badge website.

There will be several categories we will judge against, you’re automatically entered to each category:

  • Best overall badge hack (make us say uhh!)
  • Most hackerish hack (what can you hack with the badge?)
  • Most unorthodox hack (does your badge now dispense cat food?)
  • People’s choice (the tubez chuze)

The prizes will be notoriety and some 3D printed randomness courtesy of the badge crew at Workshop 88.

The astute observer will notice that the pin outs on the side of the board fit the Arduino footprint for access to many of the ATMEGA128RFA1’s peripheral systems and compatibility with most Arduino shields.  The badge can be easily reprogrammed  via the unpopulated ICSP header with (at least) the following methods:

If you’re looking to hack your badge over and over again we have a few left over prototyping kits we were selling during the con and you can get them for $20 plus shipping by emailing us here. 

These include all the prototype rails and headers you need to use arduino shields  plus the passive components necessary to power the badge from a wall wart or other external supply.  The power system components are not necessary to reprogram or hack the chip.

Register here for the contest!

 

 

New meeting schedule

Workshop88 is happy to announce a new meeting schedule staring February 2012. Meetings will be at 7 pm Thursday evenings every week, and the open hack night will be Monday nights. Class schedules and the meetup schedule will be updated to reflect these changes. Board meetings will be scheduled once a month.

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We look forward to seeing you at our new weekly meetings.