Prusa i3 MK2S 3D printer kit assembly time lapse videos

Prusa i3 MK2S 3D printer kit assembly time lapse videos

If you’ve ever wanted to see someone assemble a 3D printer from the ground up, I’ve captured every detail, sped it up, and set it to music just for you:

Link to 300x time lapse video (longer, more detail, different background music):
20170323 GoPro Prusa i3 MK2 assembly and print (300x time lapse)

The videos were captured using a GoPro Hero 3 Black in time lapse mode taking a wide angle high definition image every 5 seconds to a 64GB micro SD card.  The camera was mounted to a tripod using parts printed on the Replicator 2 and powered using a USB hub.  The resulting 30fps HD videos were created at 400% and 200% speed respectively.

History…

In 2012 I bought a MakerBot Replicator 2 for my father, which he graciously offered to keep at my house (he’s absolutely the BEST sharer).  He has since moved to a larger house and in December 2016 we happily moved the 3D printer to it’s new and rightful home in his shop where it has been getting good use making parts for an interesting capacitive network antenna power coupling project, and lots of little toys for the grand kids.  It was a great turn-key printer, able to easily slice and print models with its simple intuitive software.  Unfortunately without a heated bed and with limited head temperature it could only print using PLA. This left me without convenient access to a 3D printer, but gave me the opportunity to expand my 3D printing horizons.  I’d been considering buying one for a while, but finally I needed to make a decision.

The search…

For me, selecting a new 3D printer was as difficult as buying a new car.  There are a lot of decisions to make: Cartesian or delta? Retail, kit, or clone? Open or closed source? Which hotend? Cooling fans? Heated bed? Which materials (PLA, ABS, PETG, Nylon…)? What software can be used? and the biggie… How much do I want to spend?

I started my search with the usual “top 10” lists and “3D printer” roundup articles.

# 1 in All3DP top 10 in 2017
(All3DP is totally worth subscribing to by the way)
#1 in Make Magazine 2017 3D printer comparison
Make Magazine review:
Toms 3D review:
If you are interested in 3D printing and are not familiar with Tom, you should be, check out TOM’s 3D  website for some of the best, balanced, scientific reviews and comparisons of 3D printing components, printers, and filaments:
Tom‘s YouTube Channel:
Tom is also a moderator on Google+‘s fantastic 3D Printing group:

I didn’t have to look for very long before one machine started to tick all my boxes:

  • Open Source
  • Kit (and assembled versions available)
  • Cartesian
  • Auto mesh bed leveling
  • Part cooling fan (for PLA)
  • Heated bed (for ABS and other materials)
  • Multi-material
  • Multi-slicer,
  • Affordable
  • … and as an added bonus it has a 4 color upgrade coming later this year.

The Prusa i3 MK2

The machine…

The Prusa i3 MK2 is the latest printer designed by RepRap legend Josef Prusa, and the one at the top of the 2017 best 3D printers lists all over.  If you are not familiar with RepRap (http://reprap.org/) , it is a community of hardware and software makers who have been advancing open source 3D printing for the last couple of decades.  The basic concept behind RepRap is to create a machine capable of creating copies, or improved copies, of itself.  We all have that community to thank for democratizing and popularizing 3D printing to the point where fused filament 3D printing became commercially viable for the public (that, and a couple patents expiring).

Josef has been at the heart of two of the most popular recent open source 3D printer designs: the Mendel, and the Prusa (his namesake), each model undergoing several successful iterations and improvements.  In 2009 Josef Prusa opened shop and began selling printers and kits.  Today, true to his RepRap roots the latest machine, the Prusa i3 MK2 is used to print parts for customers printers in Prusa Research’s “build farm”.

Josef Prusa in Prusa Research’s build farm where Prusa printers are printing Prusa printers.

If you’d like to know more about the printer check out the Prusa website.

The wait…

I was going to order it over Christmas break 2016 but was waffling. I wasn’t sure if the printer was getting too much hype, or if I should get a dedicated dual head printer, or if I should just grab a turn-key printer like a Taz from a local store.  That delay would cost me a lot of time.  I eventually committed to ordering the Prusa i3 Mk2 kit in late January for a whopping $773 (USD) including shipping, an extraordinarily modest price.  Due to high demand and limited supply capacity for parts like the custom heated bed, I would have to wait 3 months.  This was not a surprise, Prusa was very clear about the lead time for their printers.  I received the printer late March.

The assembly…

By now I hope you have watched the assembly video(s).  I could have ordered the printer fully assembled and calibrated for an extra $200 (and extra lead time) but part of the reason I wanted an open source printer is to easily modify and improve it, and for that reason I wanted to know each nut and bolt personally.  It took roughly 8 hours, 5 good beers, 3 cats, and a dog (all featured in the videos) to assemble, test, and calibrate the machine.  The tree frog took 3 1/2 hours to print.  I had already read all the assembly instructions while waiting for the printer, and learned a LOT from watching Tom’s 6 part series about building the cheapest possible clone of the Prusa i3 MK2. (16 1/2 hours of interactive YouTube live streams!!! The clone was eventually named “Dolly” by someone in chat for the first cloned sheep of the same name)

  1. Prusa i3 MK2 live assembly: p1, Y-axis
  2. Prusa i3 MK2 3D printer clone live assembly: p2, X & Z Motion
  3. Prusa i3 MK2 3D printer clone live assembly: p3, X & Y Motion
  4. Prusa i3 MK2 3D printer clone live assembly: p4, Wiring and Printbed (mechanics finished!)
  5. Prusa i3 MK2 3D printer clone live assembly: p5, Electronics and Firmware!
  6. Prusa i3 MK2 3D printer clone live assembly: p6, final setup and first print!

If you decide to get the Prusa i3 MK2 kit or assemble a clone, here are some tips…

  • When there is a captured nut, POUND that nut into place before assembling the parts!!! Both Tom and I had the upper nut from the part cooling fan come loose and bounce around inside assembled parts for tens of minutes before carefully getting it seated.
  • Read ahead.  There are a few steps that provide instruction regarding previous steps like “but don’t over tighten”, or other things that may be should have been said in advance.
  • Look at all the pictures and stay organized.  The instructions are done VERY well in the “Ikea” style.  There are many details that you can only get from the pictures.
  • Be careful to use the correct length/size fasteners, rods, etc.
  • Review each step when done to make sure you didn’t skip or overlook anything.

The quality…

The print quality is amazing.

I haven’t had a lot of time to print many models yet but the resolution and quality of the first PLA print of the tree frog are far and away better than anything I’ve seen before.  It’s only 50mm wide but the surface is so smooth from the .5mm layer height, and the underside is flawless due to the part cooling fan.  The details in the eyes, nostrils, and hips are impressive too.  I’ve also printed a Raspberry Pi case, camera mount, (for OctoPi) and computer stand mounts in ABS.  I’ll be printing some drone parts soon in PETG and ABS, and bought some Nylon to play with.  I’ve tried Slic3r and Cura model slicing software used to convert models to g-code files for 3D printing.  I  preferring Slic3r which was provided by Prusa pre-optimized for this printer, but they are both very good tools.  Stay tuned to blog.workshop88.com for more of 3D printed projects in the future.

Finally, on the topic of Dolly, and a home made clone…

Even though I just bought, assembled, and am still coming up to speed on my fantastic new printer, the idea of building a clone for 1/4-1/3 the price (somewhere in the $250 range) has me and several friends on the verge of starting a group clone build.

Thanks!

Thanks to Kevin Meinert of subatomicglue for letting me use his awesome music in the videos.  If you would like to hear more, visit www.subatomicglue.com.

If you’re interested in building a Prusa or another 3D printer, or a clone, or discussing 3D printing, check out Workshop 88 on Google groups, Slack, or come by our weekly open house any Thursday night after 6:30pm.  Details can be found here.

D. Scott Williamson
Compulsively creative

CAD CAM tutorial

CAD CAM tutorial
by D.  Scott Williamson

This tutorial will show you how to use Computer Aided Design and Computer Aided Manufacturing or CAD CAM tools to create and preview a Gcode file of the Workshop 88 logo that can be run in a 3 axis CNC Mill.

Background

There are 5 main types of machine operations

  1. Engrave (follow path): The tool tip will follow the 3D path provided.
  2. Profile: The tool edge will follow either the inside or outside contour of a path down to the specified depth.
  3. Pocket: The tool will remove all the material within a contour down to the specified depth.
  4. Drill: A drill routine will be executed at each point location.  Drill routines come in 2 flavors:
    1. “Peck” used with drill bits, drills to successively deeper depths liftig the bit out of the work regularly to clear chips from the flutes.
    2. “Spiral” used with endmills that are a smaller diameter than the finished hole.
  5. 3D relief: The tool tip will remove material above a 3D surface usually specified in a 3D model or a 2D height map image.  There are two main modes:
    1. “Waterline” similar to inverted pocket operations where bulk material is efficiently removed outside the 3D model to a number of stepped depths resembling waterline in a topological map.  Typically used in a first pass with a large roughing bit to remove the bulk of the material.
    2. “Raster” moves the tip of the bit smoothly over the model in a raster pattern.

Gcode is a “numerically controlled programming language” which is why a Gcode file extension is typically .nc.  It is a human and machine readable text file.  You will rarely if ever need to look at or edit the Gcode.

Overview

This tutorial will demonstrate Engrave, Profile, and Pocket operations, which are the most popular.

There are 4 steps to this tutorial:

  1. Create a .svg file containing paths needed for machine operations
  2. Create machine operations
  3. Export Gcode
  4. Simulate, visualize and validate

Continue reading

Upcycled LCD Entertainment Center… and Paper Elephants

This past Thursday night gathering at the Workshop, Rick Stuart showed up all smiles- though I’m not sure if this was due to his enthusiasm to show off his new gadget or in anticipation of Rachel’s shortbread which had been announced earlier via email.

photo

Rick with his entertainment center

Rick has built a personal entertainment center which has the capacity to display high-defintion videos and music through an upcycled touch-screen LCD. Rick had recovered some of these screens from his previous workplace and had decided to put them to use in a new project. He has created a running loop for the system to operate: he utilized a Raspberry Pi running OpenELEC in order to run XBMC (a media center) and connected an HMDI cord to a LVDS adapter board. The adapter runs to the LCD, which is connected by USB to the Raspberry Pi. For sound, the system will be attached to speakers. Files are stored on an SD card inserted into the Raspberry Pi, and streamed files are accessible through connecting an ethernet cord.

By using HDMI instead of the normal video output connection, Rick was able to make his display high-definition. Rick said that a great advantage about his system is that he was able to essentially create his own media center out of materials he already had on hand plus the low cost of a Raspberry Pi.

Meanwhile, Zach showed me how to create very intricate origami elephants using printer paper. While there’s no hope of me recreating one on my own, I thought it was important to highlight how awesome they turned out.

Processed with VSCOcam with f2 preset

Workshop 88 walk-through at public meeting

Two of the questions we often get at Workshop 88 are: “How many people show up to your public meeetings?” and “What usually goes on at your public meetings?”

If you’ve been wondering the same things about Workshop 88, take a look at what was going on during our last meeting:

If you’ve never been to Workshop 88 before, the video gives a sense of how the makerspace is laid out.  We have four areas from front to back: meeting room, wood/metal shop, electronics/rapid prototype lab, and multimedia room. All the rooms get a lot of use; it just happened that when the video was shot there were not many people in the back rooms.

Come out some night and make something with us!

New meeting schedule

Workshop88 is happy to announce a new meeting schedule staring February 2012. Meetings will be at 7 pm Thursday evenings every week, and the open hack night will be Monday nights. Class schedules and the meetup schedule will be updated to reflect these changes. Board meetings will be scheduled once a month.

image

We look forward to seeing you at our new weekly meetings.

02/14 Meeting canceled

Steampunk Heart by chibilady17 via deviantart.com
For obvious reasons our Public Meeting, scheduled to occur on Monday, February 14, 2011 6:30 PM has been cancelled. We may be rescheduling this meeting for a later day in the week or the following week.

Keep your eyes peeled, and enjoy your Valentines Day!

UPDATE: We’ve shifted the meeting schedule by one week to accommodate. Our meetings will resume our normal every other week schedule starting on the 21st of Febuary. Our Meetup and Eventbrite calendars have been adjusted to reflect this change.

Labor Day! No General Meeting Until Sept. 13

We’re shifting the general meeting by a week, since the next one would fall on Labor Day, and we don’t want to interfere with the long weekend.

The next meeting will be on September 13th, at 6:30pm.

The main topic of discussion will be classes to be held at the space.

We’ve got a preliminary list of classes we’re planning on offering, but we’d love other suggestions, so come on out on the 13th and give us your input!