Maker Meeting December 29, 2020

Check out the December 29, 2020 Workshop 88 Maker Meeting here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D6PLhZxu954

For details (including recipes and pictures) see details on the December 29 Workshop 88 Maker Meeting page:
http://blog.workshop88.com/maker-meeting-december-29-2020-detail/

We have great things planned for the first meeting in 2021 including the design, machining, and construction of Tom’s spring loaded engraver and a considerable discussion on the topic of organization!


Workshop 88 is a makerspace in Glen Ellyn Illinois. We are more than a workshop, we are a growing community of creative talented people who aspire to learn and share knowledge, experiences, and projects.

Join us! To become a member join at Workshop88 or you can help us continue to share our projects and activities by supporting us via Patreon.

Never miss a tip or project! Follow our blog at www.Workshop88.com, subscribe to Workshop88’s YouTube channel, like us on Facebook, follow us Twitter and join or support our maker community by contributing to Workshop88 on Patreon!

To find out about upcoming events follow Workshop88 on Meetup.
Have a question? email us at info@Workshop88.com

Maker Meeting December 22, 2020

Check out the December 22, 2020 Workshop 88 Maker Meeting: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y_iZNCfRGe8

This week’s episode featured:

More details and links can be found on the December 22, 2020 Maker Meeting Workshop 88 page.


Workshop 88 is a makerspace in Glen Ellyn Illinois. We are more than a workshop, we are a growing community of creative talented people who aspire to learn and share knowledge, experiences, and projects.

Join us! To become a member join at Workshop88 or you can help us continue to share our projects and activities by supporting us via Patreon.

Never miss a tip or project! Follow our blog at www.Workshop88.com, subscribe to Workshop88’s YouTube channel, like us on Facebook, follow us Twitter and join or support our maker community by contributing to Workshop88 on Patreon!

To find out about upcoming events follow Workshop88 on Meetup.
Have a question? email us at info@Workshop88.com

Reminder! Virtual Weekly Open Houses are on Thursday nights from 7-9pm (CT)

Come join us on Thursday nights for our weekly virtual open house discussions on Zoom. We welcome makers, tinkerers, builders, artists, and all those who are curious to come chat with us about what you are making and doing.

See all the details and information either on Meetup or on Patreon!

(If all else fails, please send an email to info@workshop88.com.)

Signage at Workshop 88

Multi-material fabrication of signs at Workshop 88!

One of the challenging aspects for getting visitors to Workshop 88 is that our location is not obvious for first-time attendees. We have long joked that if you made it to our door, you must be the type of person who belongs at a makerspace, because sometimes it can seem like you really have to want to find us in order to get to Workshop 88.

Of course, we want everybody to be able to find Workshop 88! One of our members, Gail, has taken the initiative to make some signs for various uses at Workshop 88.

One sign was made with a 3d printed logo and also has solar lights attached to it for illuminating the sign after the sun sets. The other sign was made with one of our vinyl cutters and is used to direct people in for classes.

If you’re in the downtown Glen Ellyn area on Thursday evenings, you are likely to see at least one of these signs welcoming you in to our open house hours. Please stop by!

Workshop 88 Open House

May 16, 2019

Workshop 88 has an open house every Thursday from 7:00pm – 9:00pm where we welcome visitors and give shop tours. If you would like to see what’s available and what’s going on at your local makerspace or if you’d like to talk about a project you have in mind, come check us out!

As a result, Thursdays also are typically our most social night too. This week we had members working on many interesting projects including metal casting preparation, 3D printing, CNC milling, electronics, and more.

Here’s a look…

More projector fun! (see previous blog post for more details)

3D printing a space ship model to create a mold for a bronze casting

Bronze casting from the PLA model.

Meanwhile GailJo was 3D printing weatherproof sign components for illuminated Workshop 88 signs. The signs were so effective someone stopped by to check us out within 2 hours of them being placed!

I love when we have two or more 3D printers working at the same time. If you’re curious about 3D printing check out our step by step tutorial here.

Cutting up bronze casting scraps so they fit in the crucible for another casting. We used the band saw, bolt cutters, a ball peen hammer, and a vise. Copper is soft, tin is soft, mix them together you get bronze. Bronze is hard… really hard.

Jim is working on stepper motor driver electronics for a kinetic sculpture.

CNC’ing a cubic hole in a graphite block to be a mold for a future silver cube casting.

(Actually hybrid manual/CNC control in this case.)

All are welcome, we hope to see you one of these Thursday nights!

Adventures in vacuum repair

When using the Shop-Vac the other day I noticed all the dust I was sucking up was being blown out the back of the vacuum… all over me.  Intrigued and filthy, I decided to investigate…

I emptied the vacuum and took the filter outside to knock as much dust and crud off of it as I could.  I employed the standard method of smacking it on the building and quickly twisting it back and forth in the breeze being careful to stay upwind so as not to breathe the fine and disgusting particles liberated.

When replacing the filter I immediately found the problem, or more accurately I didn’t find a key part of the vacuum cleaner.  The filter retainer was missing.  Without it, whatever the vacuum sucks up can shoot through the open bottom of the filter through the impeller and get blown all over me.  Fabricating a quick replacement from parts on hand took no time at all.  Sure, I could have bought the replacement part for $9 and had it next day from Amazon, but where is the fun in that?

I found a suitable scrap of 1/4″ acrylic onto which I traced the inner and outer diameters of the filter.

Using a jigsaw with a coarse blade I cut just outside the outer diameter.  Cutting acrylic or polycarbonate with a jigsaw (or CNC) can be tricky, friction heats the blade and the chips can weld the opening closed behind the cut as pictured here.  This piece was easily broken away with my hand, but I’ve had polycarbonate heal itself apparently stronger than the uncut material when cutting too fast without any coolant or compressed air to clear the chips.

Using a ruler and pen I measured and marked the center of the diameter along several angles.  Using the hammer and punch, I punched the mark for drilling (the dimple allows the drill to center more accurately).  This level of precision was not necessary but I find striking things with a hammer fun and habits like punching before drilling are good to reinforce.

I clamped the burgeoning new cover in the vise and drilled the center hole.  The bolt hardware is the ubiquitous 1/4″-20 (1/4 inch diameter, 20 threads per inch, super common stuff), so I’m going to drill the hole a little larger, 3/8″ to make it easy to slide on and off.  I don’t want to drill a hole that large to start with in the acrylic because it will catch a lot and cause chipping or cracking, so I started with a smaller 1/8″ drill and worked up through a couple sizes.

Now I need to install a mounting rod in the bottom of the vacuum cleaner.  Marking the center of the bottom of the vacuum cleaner filter holder was even easier.  I just connected the lines between the edges of retaining tabs on the outer edge.  This plastic is thin and soft enough to drill directly with the 1/4″ bit.

Then I installed the filter holder pin by putting a 4″ 1/4″-20 bolt through a lock washer, then a fender washer then fed it through the hole from behind (from the vacuum cleaner side) to stick out the bottom.  I followed that with another fender washer, a lock washer and a nut.  The fender washers sandwich the plastic to spread out any load and prevent cracking around the hole.  The lock washers keep the nuts tight even under the vibration of the running Shop-Vac.

The filter slides over the outside, and the cover slides over the bolt to seal it in place.  Another fender washer, lock washer, and convenient wingnut secure the assembly with a good tight seal.

At this point the filter replacement was functional but by no means done.  Workshop88 is a makerspace, and that means nothing is done unless you’ve used the laser or a 3D printer, so Christine engraved the lid.

IMG_5309

Voila!

I could have easily ordered the appropriate replacement and had the fresh new part the next morning, but by creating one myself I get the satisfaction of a job well done, and I was able to vacuum up the acrylic chips from the jigsaw and drill right away.

D. Scott Williamson
Compulsively Creative