Workshop 88 Weekly Maker Night – October 27,2020

Introduction – Workshop 88 is a makerspace in Glen Ellyn Illinois. We are more than a workshop, we are a growing community of creative talented people who aspire to learn and share their insights, experiences, and projects.

This is the first ever Workshop 88 Makers Round-table on Zoom where we plan to share our projects, ideas, and related resources. The attendees and agenda are below, the meeting will be recorded and hosted on YouTube, and resources like links and other related information can be found here after the event.

Attendees

  • Andrew Morrison
  • Scott Williamson
  • Jim Williams
  • Tom Matukas

Show and tell time!

Each session will target 10 minutes for show and tell and 5 minutes for Q&A

7:05pm – Scott Williamson to share FPV (First-person view) drone insights, including his 3D printed Peon230 hand built drone, tiny HD “Whoop” drone, transmitter, goggles, headset, display, and an overview of the hardware and software components including Betaflight configurator and black box.

7:20pm – Jim Williams <show and tell or shop tour>

7:35pm – Tom Matukas – Covid-19 laser choir project overview

Tonight’s discussion topics

7:50pm – Incomplete, abandoned, and bucket list projects

8:15pm – Dealing with Joy-Con Drift – Can I replace the joystick myself with a kit? (Tips, tricks and confidence building aka moral support)

Open Discussion

8:30pm

Meeting notes

  • YouTube link to this event: tbd
  • Resources
    • Drones
      • tbd
  • Retrospective:
    • Repeat? weekly, fortnightly, monthly?
    • How to better manage and announce the agenda? (post or page?)
    • How to manage the growing backlog of topics and segment ideas

Please subscribe to Workshop88’s YouTube page, like us on facebook, and join or support our maker community by contributing to our Patreon.

Quick project video

Some of the Workshop 88 members have been working on a system for allowing multiple people to sing together while maintaining social distancing requirements. Without giving too much away right now, let’s just say that there has been a lot of discussion between members about transmitting sound via laser. Above is a very simple project demonstrating this process.

If you’re interested in hearing about these projects, please join us on Thursday nights via Zoom – details are on our meetup page!

Workshop 88 open house tours are suspended through end of April

Due to the governor’s order to stay at home through the end of April, Workshop 88 will continue our suspension of  public open house tours on Thursday nights.

We would still like to meet makers and connect with you! Please see our Meetup page for information on how you may interact with us including virtual tours and virtual open house visits on Thursday nights.

Doorknob Handle

Like many Americans, my family had a spring break vacation planned just as the Coronavirus pandemic began to spread in North America. For weeks while looking forward to spring break we had been watching the dramatic growth of COVID-19 and steps taken to contain and control the virus in China, and more recently in Italy, Iran, and South Korea. We decided to cancel our vacation and begin social distancing. While disappointed, it was immediately clear that we made the right decision for ourselves as we would have likely been stranded away from our home in the USA and for everyone else in this time of aggressive spread of a highly infectious disease that hospitalizes 1 in 10 and kills 1 in 50 people.

We made our decision on Saturday the day before our flight was to leave, we all thought about social distancing and what we should do to protect ourselves and potentially others from us (two of us had recent colds and were uncertain if we caught it and symptoms were mild). Hand washing, not touching our faces, sanitizing everything around us were discussed, but when I found out that COVID-19 could last an astonishing 3 days on metal and plastic surfaces I immediately noticed all the doorknobs in our house. A doorknob you have to grasp with hour hand requiring a lot of contact, a door handle you can open with your elbow, or at least one finger. After you’ve been out in public touching door handles, railings, shopping carts, elevator buttons, ATM’s, money, gas pumps… You have to touch the exterior doorknob to enter the house before you are able to wash your hands, and everyone needs to touch it.

I also felt like I wanted to do something to help. I decided to design and share a customizable 3D printable handle that could be easily and nondestructively be attached to doorknobs. Not only are they more sanitary, but they turned out to be immensely convenient when carrying in groceries, or walking out with a beverage, etc. Below are links to my models and source code on Thingiverse, along with the write-up that accompanies them.

Updated stronger customizable doorknob handle with more options: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4228668
Note: Thingiverse customizer does not work with this model, it may be too complicated. Download Knob handle v5.scad*, open in OpenSCAD, and enable the Cusomizer UI in the View menu.

Original door handle: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4224517

Unfortunately this was inspired by Coronavirus COVID-19

If you think these may help you, your family, or others, please feel free to customize and print as many as needed.

If you would like to manufacture and commercialize this product please contact me, we can work something out.

Novel Coronavirus or COVID-19 is spread like cold and flu viruses via contact with droplets (sneezes, coughs) from an infected individual. It has been proven viable in the air for 3 hours and has been demonstrated to contaminate surfaces for up to 3 days where it may be picked up on hands. A potential vector for infection is touching your face (mouth, nose, or eyes) with the virus on your hands. Frequent thorough hand washing with soap and water and minimizing touching your face are suggested ways to reduce the likelihood of contracting the Novel Coronavirus COVID-19 infection.

Centers for Disease Control: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/transmission.html

The use of round doorknobs require a hand to grasp and twist to open a door. Entry and exit doors in particular must be touched by everyone entering a household, are usually touched before having access to a sink, and after potentially touching public handles, railings, shopping carts, elevator buttons, ATM’s, money, gas pumps, rest rooms… Doors with handles can be opened with elbows and forearms which are less likely to relay infection.

This handle is easy to print and clamps firmly, gently, and non-destructively to round doorknobs.

An added bonus: Handles are easier to open while carrying packages, groceries, or beverages!

Styles

There are two styles, flat (push) and curved (pull).

The flat version will likely print more easily and is perfectly fine for doors that push open.

The curved version is tailored for doors that need to be pulled and in general is more universal.

I can open our doors inside and out with my elbows, but even if you can’t get your elbow in there, at least you can limit exposure to one finger rather your whole hand grabbing a doorknob.

You can customize the length, style, size of the doorknob and more in the OpenSCAD parameters in the file (even more if you dig into the code – have fun!).

Fitting

The default size is 54mm diameter, 23mm thick doorknob. The model can accommodate slightly larger and smaller sizes as is.

To fit your doorknob you may either scale the STL file before printing (measure your doorknob diameter D and scale by D/54), or adjust the parameters in OpenSCAD, render (F6), save STL, and print your customized model.

Installation

The door handle may be installed horizontally but I like ours elevated (rotated “up”) 30-50 degrees to provide more of a usable rotation arc with my elbow.

Attach to doorknob

  1. Slip handle over your doorknob, it should fit snug but not crack
  2. Fasten with a machine screw or bolt (M3, 4-40, 2-56, or anything that will fit)
    • Lock nuts are preferred to regular nuts
    • Use of washers on both sides is recommended to distribute forces
  3. If snug enough, it may work fine without a screw
  4. Optional: If your handle slips, you can slip or wrap a rubber band between the doorknob and the ring before tightening the screw. You do not need to put the rubber band around the doorknob (that would be very difficult), it just needs to compress the rubber against the doorknob in one location to improve grip. Alternately, (more easily) you could wrap a rubber band around one arm of the handle ring prior to installation as pictured, but the rubber band will be visible once installed.

Note, there should be enough friction to open the door with your elbow or knee
but the plastic handle may not be able to grab the smooth metal doorknob with enough force to secure it against any force without slipping. Simply slide it back to the original position or you can try installing a rubber band for more “gription“.

Conclusion

I will never know, but I hope this is helpful. I hope this has a chance of preventing at least one person from getting sick – even if it is not against Coronavirus, perhaps against one of the 200 viruses known to cause the common cold, or influenza (8,200 deaths in US in 2019), or Norovirus…

Maybe you just want to make it easier to bring in your groceries.

If you would like to support invention for the greater good, you can donate to your local makerspace… or mine: http://blog.workshop88.com/
http://blog.workshop88.com/membership/#donations
(they will need support during these times of social distancing and isolation)

Also, please don’t judge my filthy garage/workshop doors too harshly… I have to go scrub them now.

Stay well, wash your hands, and don’t touch your face!

D. Scott Williamson
Compulsively Creative

Local history in Workshop 88’s…parking lot?

Photo of new sign at the parking lot outside of Workshop 88. Photo credit: Gail Jo Kelly

Earlier this week, one of our members noticed that the name of the parking lot outside of Workshop 88 had been changed – it used to be called Schock’s Square, and now it is called Pennsylvania East. Some of us thought that was a rather dull name compared to Schock’s Square (the street name is Pennsylvania Avenue) and got us to wonder about who was the Schock of Schock’s Square, anyway?

Another member took the initiative to call the Glen Ellyn Public Library to see if they had any information about the history of Schock’s Square, and a few days later we received the following email from Amy Franco, one of the librarians:

Thanks for your super interesting question about the origins of the name of Schock’s Square in downtown Glen Ellyn! No one at the library knew anything about it, and we couldn’t find anything about it in any of our traditional resources. So I called Harold Prichard, one of our longtime Glen Ellyn residents and he told me a fascinating story:
 
George Schock owned a gas station where the square now is in the 40s and possibly the 30s, during a time when there was a gas station on nearly every corner of Glen Ellyn. At George’s station, when you pulled in, they’d check the tires and all the gauges, clean the car, and everyone who worked for him was really nice. George’s station was a few cents more than his competitors’, but his regulars were willing to go there because of the great service and nice people he had working for him.
 
George would invite some of his regular clientele to join him in the back of the shop for a glass of whiskey while the car was being checked and filled. On Christmas, he would have a huge buffet at the gas station and many locals would stop by. Overall, he was extremely successful and in Mr. Prichard’s opinion George Schock was held in the same esteem in town as the McChesney, Miller, and Young families.
 
George had two young boys working for him, Ken and Will Major. George taught them about entrepreneurship and how to maintain a clientele, and eventually encouraged the Majors boys to open their own gas station around the corner from him at Crescent and Park where there is now a condo building. Willard Major’s obituary (attached) makes note of running Ken and Will’s Union 76 Service Station from 1955-1985.


I’ve also included a (somewhat grainy) copy of George Schock’s obituary from 1966 in the Glen Ellyn News. The text reads:

George J. Schock, Veteran Business Operator, Dies

George J. Schock, a Glen Ellyn business operator for nearly 40 years and owner of Schock’s Service Station, died early yesterday morning at Central DuPage Hospital after a short illness. 

Born in Chicago March 27, 1903, he had lived in or near GLen Ellyn all his life. At the time of his passing he resided on Naperville rd. south of Wheaton. 

His marriage to the former Kathryn Pegg took place in Glen Ellyn. 

The deceased was the oldest service station operator in the area in point of continuous service. He and his brother, Paul, now of Morris, founded the station at its present location. Paul left the business many years ago. George was one of few service station operators owning his own premises. 

Survivors in addition to his wife and brother include a son and daughter-in-law, Richard and Mary Ellen Schock of Glen Ellyn, and a daughter and son-in-law, Joan and Donald McLeese, also of Glen Ellyn. Also surviving are eight grandchildren, George, Kathy and Brian Schock, and Don, Dick, Doug, David, and Katie McLeese. 

Funeral arrangements were incomplete at press time. Arrangements are being handled by the Leonard Memorial Home of Glen Ellyn. 

From private correspondence with Amy Franco, librarian at Glen Ellyn Public Library. Reprinted with permission.


This is a fantastic example of what you can learn from your local library! Workshop 88 has always had a great relationship with the Glen Ellyn Library and other nearby libraries. Our members tend to be curious people, and when we get stuck on a question and are unable to find the information we want it is really great to be able to ask for help from the staff at the library.

George Schock obituary (Image credit: Glen Ellyn Public Library)

Custom Workshop 88 Projector

Tonight at CNC Build Club we discussed the enclosure for the MPCNC electronics and while Tom continued to work on the design and GailJo was busy 3D printing pieces for Workshop 88 signs, I (Scott) experimented with new projector inserts for GailJo’s holiday projector.


I found some transparencies and using the Workshop 88 logo I grabbed off this website I printed a few sizes.

I found the one closest in size to the images included with the projector, cut it out, and installed it.

Voilà! It worked perfectly!

We grabbed a long extension cord, took it outside, and projected it on everything. Fun!