Maker Meeting January 5, 2021

Check out the January 5, 2021 Workshop 88 Maker Meeting here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D6PLhZxu954


Workshop 88 is a makerspace in Glen Ellyn Illinois. We are more than a workshop, we are a growing community of creative talented people who aspire to learn and share knowledge, experiences, and projects.

Join us! To become a member join at Workshop88 or you can help us continue to share our projects and activities by supporting us via Patreon.

Never miss a tip or project! Follow our blog at www.Workshop88.com, subscribe to Workshop88’s YouTube channel, like us on Facebook, follow us Twitter and join or support our maker community by contributing to Workshop88 on Patreon!

To find out about upcoming events follow Workshop88 on Meetup.
Have a question? email us at info@Workshop88.com

Maker Meeting December 29, 2020

Check out the December 29, 2020 Workshop 88 Maker Meeting here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D6PLhZxu954

For details (including recipes and pictures) see details on the December 29 Workshop 88 Maker Meeting page:
http://blog.workshop88.com/maker-meeting-december-29-2020-detail/

We have great things planned for the first meeting in 2021 including the design, machining, and construction of Tom’s spring loaded engraver and a considerable discussion on the topic of organization!


Workshop 88 is a makerspace in Glen Ellyn Illinois. We are more than a workshop, we are a growing community of creative talented people who aspire to learn and share knowledge, experiences, and projects.

Join us! To become a member join at Workshop88 or you can help us continue to share our projects and activities by supporting us via Patreon.

Never miss a tip or project! Follow our blog at www.Workshop88.com, subscribe to Workshop88’s YouTube channel, like us on Facebook, follow us Twitter and join or support our maker community by contributing to Workshop88 on Patreon!

To find out about upcoming events follow Workshop88 on Meetup.
Have a question? email us at info@Workshop88.com

Maker Meeting December 22, 2020

Check out the December 22, 2020 Workshop 88 Maker Meeting here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y_iZNCfRGe8

This week’s episode featured:

More details and links can be found on the December 22, 2020 Maker Meeting Workshop 88 page.


Workshop 88 is a makerspace in Glen Ellyn Illinois. We are more than a workshop, we are a growing community of creative talented people who aspire to learn and share knowledge, experiences, and projects.

Join us! To become a member join at Workshop88 or you can help us continue to share our projects and activities by supporting us via Patreon.

Never miss a tip or project! Follow our blog at www.Workshop88.com, subscribe to Workshop88’s YouTube channel, like us on Facebook, follow us Twitter and join or support our maker community by contributing to Workshop88 on Patreon!

To find out about upcoming events follow Workshop88 on Meetup.
Have a question? email us at info@Workshop88.com

Member project – 3D printer nozzle cleaner

Nozzle cleaner for 3D printers

Did you know that Workshop 88 members have several of their original designs shared on Thingiverse?

This is a nozzle-cleaning tool that Workshop 88 member, GailJo has shared on Thingiverse and we make use of at Workshop 88. This was one of the tools featured in last week’s Maker Meeting discussion.

See the tool described here, starting at 13 minutes in:

Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/workshop88
Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/workshop88
Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Workshop88

New member special for December/January!

Special deal for the end of the year - 4 months of membership for $150
(Deal open to all new members or returning members who have not been a member for more than 3 months.)

Are you a maker living in DuPage county, IL or anywhere close to Glen Ellyn and interested in a Workshop 88 membership? We are running a special deal for the months of December and January – 4 months of membership for $150! This is like getting an entire month for free!

What do you get with your membership? Plenty!

  • 24/7 access to the workshop and all tools (following our COVID safety protocols)
  • Access to our slack workspace
  • Invitations to members-only zoom meetings
  • Free registration for classes (when offered)

This makes a great gift for the holidays! Or maybe you’re looking to kickstart your New Year’s resolution to do more making – learning about 3D printing, electronics, laser cutting, metal working, wood working, or anything else that you can dream of doing with us!

Contact us by email to take advantage of this deal: info@workshop88.com

Melamine or chipboard drawer face repair

Last week I shut one of my shop drawers loaded with sandpaper and manuals with a too much “gusto” which ripped the drawer face off and left large deep pits in the chipboard around the mounting screws. Here is how I fixed it.

Aw shucks!

This is the broken drawer, you can see how the 4 mounting screws ripped deep holes out of the Melamine chipboard drawer front.

For this repair you will need:

  • Eye protection
  • Pen or pencil
  • Ruler (preferably long)
  • Saw, container, and sieve (or sawdust)
  • Wood glue
  • Wire brush (optional)
  • Clamps (screw clamps and hand clamps used in the example)
  • Scrap wood to protect your surfaces from clamps
  • Screwdriver suitable for your existing drawer screws
  • Paper (sticker backing, baking parchment, or waxed paper is best)
  • Popsicle stick or similar spreader
  • Disposable cup or other container
  • Sharp chisel or sandpaper (optional)

Wearing eye protection, clean out the holes. You can compressed air, or you can pucker up and blow them out with your own compressed air but be sure to close your eyes and wear eye protection, sawdust and debris is nearly guaranteed to blow right into your eyes with this method (voice of experience). Alternatively you can gently clean them out with a brush with the holes facing downward.

Next, mark lines through the centers of the screw holes around each pit. This step is important for getting the screw holes located later in the repair so the drawer front is aligned and spaced properly so take your time. I found using a long ruler lined up with the centers of pairs of holes horizontally, vertically, and diagonally to mark the area around each repair worked well. If you use a permanent marker as I have take note which areas of the back of the drawer face will be visible when reassembled. It may be useful to look at other drawers to get an idea of what areas will be visible. If you use a pencil or erasable marker (dry erase, grease pencil) be careful not to erase your marks later when working in the area.

Next you will need sawdust. I grabbed a piece of scrap plywood, clamped it in the vice and started cutting from the end. After 3 cuts I felt I had enough. You want the sawdust pretty fine, no chunks or splinters so I sieved it.

Now it’s time to make our own chipboard filler and fill the holes. I mixed up a little at a time so I could get the consistency I wanted and so the batch wouldn’t get too gummy while working. Start with glue in a disposable container. I used a plastic cup but it can be any container as long as it is clean. I start with glue, add sawdust which will absorb some of the moisture of the glue and mix. I keep adding glue or sawdust until the mixture is a putty like spreadable consistency. You want it on the wet side so the glue can bond to the chipboard in the next step.

Working one hole at a time using the Popsicle stick or spreader, start pressing the filler into a hole. You want to pack it as deep as you can into the bottom without leaving voids or bubbles. The glue will shrink as the moisture evaporates during curing so mound the holes full.

Now we are going to apply some pressure with clamps. Select pieces of scrap wood to protect your surfaces from the clamps which will dent, scratch, and break the surfaces of your drawers if they are not protected. I used screw clamps, you can use whatever you have available.
Place a piece of paper over each glue filled hole. If your paper has a shiny side that side should face the glue. Place smooth wooden blocks large enough to more than cover the hole over the paper. With a second wooden block on the other side tighten each clamp. The clamp should be snug to tight, you don’t need to crush the wood, just hold it tightly together.

Leave for a two to three hours to let the pressure distribute the materials and the glue will penetrate the existing chipboard.

The glue will not cure if covered so after several hours remove the clamps and carefully remove the paper to leave as much filler as possible in the holes. Leave them overnight to dry or longer to dry and cure. They will likely take longer to cure than wood glue usually takes due to the volume of the filler.

You will probably notice that the old screw threads are full of wood. Clean them with a wire brush so they bite into the repaired drawer face without interference. If you don’t have a wire brush you may be able to clean them using the drawer body front by backing them all the way out. This step is not critical.

The next day or when you are confident all the filler has fully cured you can proceed. The filler likely contracted leaving the center slightly concave, this is OK. If you have a large void and feel you need more filler you can repeat the above steps but it is usually not necessary.

Remove any excess glue or filler on the drawer face. A sharp broad chisel worked very well for me. You can try a razor scraper or sandpaper. Assuming you don’t have any large lumps this step is optional to assure a snug smooth fit between surfaces.

Select an appropriately sized pilot hole drill bit. I typically do this by holding candidate bits behind and in front of the screw. For woodworking in solid wood I would normally select a slightly smaller bit but considering my experience with chipboard, I selected a bit that was nearly the diameter of the center of the screw leaving plenty of material for the threads to bite into.

This is a good time to create a depth gauge by wrapping your drill bit with a piece of painters tape to indicate how long the screws are (not pictured). This will allow drilling holes deep enough for the screws without drilling all the way through to the face of the drawer.

Using a ruler and sharp pencil, re-draw the lines to determine where the screw centers should be.

Carefully drill pilot holes at the screw center locations. Make sure the drill holes are perpendicular to the drawer face (not angled). Again, be careful to drill the holes deep enough for the screws but not deep enough to damage the front of the drawer face on the other side.

Back up the screws so that only the points protrude and get some hand clamps ready. We will use the screw tips to align the drawer face on the drawer and hold it in place with the clamps.

Place the drawer front on the drawer carefully locating each screw tip in one of the pilot holes you drilled. Once aligned place the hand clamps and take a moment to verify the screws are in the holes and the drawer face looks properly positioned and aligned. Take your time on this step.

Gently tighten the screws. I give each screw a couple turns with a hand screwdriver and move on to the next until they are all fully screwed in. Don’t over torque the screws, you know what they’re biting into. I advise tightening these by hand with a manual screwdriver. If you choose to use an electric screwdriver, use slow speed (screwdriver, not drill), the lowest torque setting, and still do the final tightening with a hand screwdriver.

There are a couple optional things you can do for additional strength:

  • You could drill pilot holes and add more screws into fresh material. Again, be careful to select appropriate size/length screws so you get a good bite without drilling or screwing through the face of the drawer.
  • You could apply epoxy between the faces before screwing them together for a permanent bond but you better get everything aligned perfect because there is no undoing that. (not advised)

Perfect fit! Which one was repaired?

The top drawer, ready to be re-filled.

Clean up the shop. 😉

I hope this was helpful and you picked up a tip or two.

Stay tuned here on the Workshop88 blog for more articles and updates, subscribe to Workshop88’s YouTube channel for our regular Maker Meetings and other content, like us on facebook, join or support our maker community by contributing to our Patreon (we could really use your help!).

D. Scott Williamson
Compulsively Creative

Workshop 88 – Weekly Maker Meeting Episode 1

We had a GREAT time last night learning about mechanical keyboards, home automation, antennas for HAM and TV, and the Nintendo Switch joycons.  Here’s the video:



Please: Like, Subscribe, and SHARE the links with people you know.  We’d love to grow the channel and do more. 

Also, if you are not yet a member of Workshop 88, please consider supporting Workshop 88 on Patreon where you will get links to log in to the live Weekly Maker Meetings.

Workshop 88 Weekly Maker Night – October 27,2020

YouTube link to this event

Introduction – Workshop 88 is a makerspace in Glen Ellyn Illinois. We are more than a workshop, we are a growing community of creative talented people who aspire to learn and share their insights, experiences, and projects.

Please subscribe to Workshop88’s YouTube channel, like us on facebook, and join or support our maker community by contributing to Workshop88 on Patreon!

To find out about upcoming events follow Workshop88 on Meetup.
Do you have a question? email us at info@Workshop88.com

This is the first ever Workshop 88 Makers Round-table on Zoom where we plan to share our projects, ideas, and related resources. The attendees and agenda are below, the meeting will be recorded and hosted on YouTube, and resources like links and other related information can be found here after the event.

Attendees

  • Andrew Morrison
  • Scott Williamson
  • Jim Williams
  • Tom Matukas
  • Gail Jo Kelley
  • Rick Stewart

Show and tell time!

Each session will target 10 minutes for show and tell and 5 minutes for Q&A

7:05pm – Scott Williamson to share FPV (First-person view) drone insights, including his 3D printed Peon230 hand built drone, tiny HD “Whoop” drone, transmitter, goggles, headset, display, and an overview of the hardware and software components including Betaflight configurator and black box.

7:20pm – Jim Williams shared magnetic visualization film and interesting phenomenon with flexible sheet “refrigerator magnets”.

7:35pm – Tom Matukas – Covid-19 laser choir project overview

Tonight’s discussion topics

7:50pm – Incomplete, abandoned, and bucket list projects

8:15pm – Dealing with Joy-Con Drift – Can I replace the joystick myself with a kit?

Game Console: Nintendo Switch

Video Watched to learn how to replace the joy stick: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMHl7GwbEb0

Replacement Kit ordered on Amazon: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMHl7GwbEb0

Open Discussion

8:30pm

Meeting notes

Links mentioned:

Here is the BEC, ESC, Control, and motors I have on my FPVracing drone now ($83.30 on Banggood right now):

Here is what I’d get today ($80.97 on Banggood right now).

  • Retrospective:
    • Repeat? weekly, fortnightly, monthly?
    • How to better manage and announce the agenda? (post or page?)
    • How to manage the growing backlog of topics and segment ideas

Please subscribe to Workshop88’s YouTube page, like us on facebook, and join or support our maker community by contributing to our Patreon.