Fun with Workshop 88 Logo

My name is Gail Jo and I LIKE TO MAKE STUFF.

Quick Bio

I joined Workshop 88 in December of 2016. I have been 3D printing since June of 2014. I have worked with machines and computers my entire career.

3D Printed Coasters

Workshop 88 Coasters

Coasters are one of my specialties when it comes to 3D printing. So once I got my hands on the Workshop 88 logo, I just had to make it into coasters. The challenge was how to print with 3 different colors. It helped to have a dual nozzle 3D printer. I started with white filament and when the blue 88 portion started, it was time to pause the printer and change the white filament to red.

Sugar Cookies

I wish I had more pictures of the cookies I made, but fortunately they were eaten. The cookies, not the pictures.

Workshop 88 Cookies

Since there was so much work involved in the post production to add the logo, I started with the Pillsbury Sugar Cookie Dough cookie dough in a roll, rather than make cookie dough from scratch.

3D Printed Workshop 88 Cookie Cutter

This was an attempt at a cookie cutter. The 88s were just too complex to release the cookie dough. I 3D printed about 6 other variations, changing the size and design.

For the red, upper crown part, I attempted to color the dough with red food coloring. And then I froze the dough to try and make it stronger and easier to work with. I also added red sprinkles to the top part. This made the 3D printed part more of stencil to hold them in before baking.

3D Printed Workshop 88 Cookie Stencil

The final version ended up acting as a stencil for spraying on the blue color of the logo. Notice the top part, the red part was covered, so that the spray would not cover that part.

Blue Color Mist from Wilton

Be forewarned, the spray went all over. You may not see it at first, but wipe the area and you will discover it. Find a good place. But in the end, using the spray and the stencil produced the best results. (The color mist was available at WalMart.)

Making a Workshop 88 Sign

Workshop 88 has been known to be a bit difficult to find. So I thought I would make a sign to put out on Pennsylvania Ave during open houses to help people find the workshop. If you wonder why I didn’t just go buy one, then you do not think like a maker.

Iteration 1 – Laser Cutter

I thought it would be nice to use the Laser Cutter and some poster board to create the first sign. This would keep the sign light and I wouldn’t have to manually cut out a bunch of letters. I used foam board from Dollar Store and poster board I had lying around. Unfortunately, I didn’t think about what would happen on the rainy Thursday nights the sign would be out so I continued creating. Also, I discovered the logo I was using was the older version. So I ended up putting the sign on the glass of the door of the workshop so that if any visitors stopped by when nobody was around, they would still be notified to come back on a Thursday evening.

3D Printed Parts

Iteration 2 – 3D Printed Parts on Yard Sign

Of course, I went straight to what I know, and attempted to 3D print out all of the parts of the sign. This of course made the sign quite heavier than it needed to be. Not the mention the coats of paint I added to cover up the original sign. But I did learn a few techniques along the way. I think I got better at printing flat letters inside a flat layer. I also learned that my 3D printer could use some design improvements, or precision improvements, but that is for another day.

Iteration 3 – Vinyl Cutter

The final method involved learning to use the Vinyl Cutter. It’s a good thing learning how to use new equipment is something I enjoy and enhances my resources for future projects. I was motivated to make another sign because I needed one for the 3D printing class at Workshop 88. This version is sleek and clean since it only provides the information needed. I relied on brand recognition for this version, since “Workshop” is not carved out in the red part. Stay tuned to this blog for more projects using the Vinyl Cutter.

Nice and Shiny Vinyl Version

What do you want to make?

Do you own your own business and want to make a few trinkets with your logo? Stop by on a Thursday evening for our open house for a tour and a friendly discussion to share ideas. Thanks for reading.

Making custom awards

Custom award made at Workshop 88.

One of our members, Mark Frost, recently made up some custom awards for a group at his church. Here’s what he had to say about this project:

Every summer for 30+ years some guys from church have been doing a golf trip. I’ve been going for the last 15years or so and have recently taken over the “hardware” aspect. In previous years we would order engraves plaques, mugs, glasses, embroidered towels, etc. But this year I figured I’d take production “in-house”. I grabbed the church and resort logos, threw the text on top and engraved squares I cut from a 2’x2′ MDF board from HD

Mark Frost via slack.com

This is a really great example of the kinds of projects that our members are able to create quickly at Workshop 88! What could you make with a laser cutter/engraver?

Mustard etching?

knife3

Knife with mustard packet before the etching.

We’ve been playing with the etching of metals with our laser cutter at Workshop 88. One of our members discovered a mustard-etching method and tested it out last night during the weekly open house.

knife2

Reapplying mustard between passes.

knife1

Finished etched knife after cleaning.

The results are pretty great for a first attempt! Expect more detail to come in future posts – but if you want to know more, please come to our open house meetings every Thursday night!

W88 Laser Cutter First Steps

Cooling+Exhaust5838The dead laser cutter donated to us by Inventables after blowing one too many power supplies is running!  While not yet ready for prime time, a water cooling system in a bucket and a fume exhaust thru the flue from the old furnace allowed first tests.  The Shapeoko laptop hosts the RetinaEngrave software that makes it look like a Windows printer.

We’re still getting our feet wet with laser power, speed, number of passes, raster vs FirstCutWolfHead3529vector operations, but we’ve actually cut some paper, wood, and plastic.  This wolf head – courtesy of Google Images – DollGoggles6419adorning a circular saw push stick was the first actual cut.

Daniil had the honor of being the first to produce an actual useful object on the cutter.  We think his daughter will be thrilled with these laser cut, hot air station formed goggles for her skateboarding doll.  She’s been trying to get some for a whTripleSpiral1470ile now.

There’s still a lot of work to do making much more proper implementations of cooling and exhaust systems.  We need proper electrical connections to guarantee the cooling will be running if the laser is on, and a damper on the exhaust pipe to keep cold air out and the landlord happy.  Lots more Ts to cross and Is to dot.  But it’s actually cutting stuff and hasn’t blown up yet!

BlueTape4371Update 11/12/15:  The laser is coming along.  We now have “air assist”, and have done some more tests and cuts.  Here’s a test using painter’s tape to reduce smoke damage, and a nice W88 logo.

W88Logo3mmPly2334