Upcycled LCD Entertainment Center… and Paper Elephants

This past Thursday night gathering at the Workshop, Rick Stuart showed up all smiles- though I’m not sure if this was due to his enthusiasm to show off his new gadget or in anticipation of Rachel’s shortbread which had been announced earlier via email.

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Rick with his entertainment center

Rick has built a personal entertainment center which has the capacity to display high-defintion videos and music through an upcycled touch-screen LCD. Rick had recovered some of these screens from his previous workplace and had decided to put them to use in a new project. He has created a running loop for the system to operate: he utilized a Raspberry Pi running OpenELEC in order to run XBMC (a media center) and connected an HMDI cord to a LVDS adapter board. The adapter runs to the LCD, which is connected by USB to the Raspberry Pi. For sound, the system will be attached to speakers. Files are stored on an SD card inserted into the Raspberry Pi, and streamed files are accessible through connecting an ethernet cord.

By using HDMI instead of the normal video output connection, Rick was able to make his display high-definition. Rick said that a great advantage about his system is that he was able to essentially create his own media center out of materials he already had on hand plus the low cost of a Raspberry Pi.

Meanwhile, Zach showed me how to create very intricate origami elephants using printer paper. While there’s no hope of me recreating one on my own, I thought it was important to highlight how awesome they turned out.

Processed with VSCOcam with f2 preset

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Lots of lasers!

Originals0701Mark Edmonson recently donated a big box of pretty high quality used battery powered laser levels to us.  They’re in various states, from apparently completely functional to rather dead.

Each one contains 5 diode lasers, as well as some other parts.  There are fairly complete teardown notes and pictures here.

Parts0769Here are the parts I salvaged from one.

Thanks, Mark!

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Automated Haunted Dollhouse part of Rachel’s Maker Faire exhibit

Pursuing her passion for making technology accessible to girls, Rachel Hellenga inspired a whirlwind project to automate a dollhouse.  After the smoke cleared, the one-room dollhouse she and Jim W and Bill P built was a miniature version of – and is now displayed within – the “Circuit Castle” she’s showing at the New York Maker Faire.  Read her Make Magazine blog post about it.

The Dollhouse Automation System powering it is a collection of small, cheap microcontrollers in a simple network allowing sensors (push buttons, motion detectors, light sensors, etc) in one part of the house to control actions (lights, motors, sounds etc) in another part of the house.

AutomatedDollhouse

Here are some gory details of putting that system together.

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Intro to Electronics

photo by Windell Oskay on flickr

Workshop 88′s Kevin Roof will be hosting an “Intro to electronics” class. Come out and start learning the basics of resistors, capacitors, transistors, diodes and basic circuits. In this class you will build an LED throwie which conserves battery power by turning off during the day.

This class will consist of five main sections including:

Series of tubes:
Current
Voltage
Resistance

Schematics:
Identifying components
Reading circuit diagrams

Resistors:
Identifying values
Ohm’s Law
Parallel and Series

Transistors:
How they work
Using them as a switch

Building your LED throwie!

Contact: info@workshop88.com
Twitter: @Workshop88

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Introduction to Electronics

Come out and start learning the basics of resistors, capacitors, transistors, diodes and all types of basic circuits. In this class you will build an LED throwie which conserves battery power by turning off during the day.

All materials and a textbook will be included for this class.

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